Extracts from Letters from Mrs. J. G. Kerr, January 22, 1914, and "Memorial Services in Memory of Rev. Henry V. Noyes, of Canton, China"

noyes_c_misc_948.pdf

Dublin Core

Title

Extracts from Letters from Mrs. J. G. Kerr, January 22, 1914, and "Memorial Services in Memory of Rev. Henry V. Noyes, of Canton, China"

Subject

Death; Missionaries; Death notices; Memorial service; Funeral service; Christianity; God; Duty; Vocation

Description

These two typed sheets include extracts of letters from Martha and Harriet and a paper about the memorial services held for Henry, although some writing with an unknown author precedes both of these excerpts. The letter from Mattie is addressed to her sisters and notify her family in the United States of Henry's death. Henry died shortly after being elected the president of the Medical Missionary Society. Harriet writes to the "Dear Ones at Home" with similar sentiments to Mattie, but outlines how the Chinese reacted to his death more thoroughly, as well as the decor for mourning. The last page, the paper on the memorial services, goes into detail about the decoration and program of Henry's funeral service. It also catalogs Henry's life and his work with the Canton Mission.

Creator

Kerr, Martha Noyes
Noyes, Harriet Newell
Unknown

Source

Loose, The College of Wooster, Special Collections, Noyes Collection

Publisher

Unpublished

Date

1914-01-22

Contributor

Council on Library and Information Resources Hidden Special Collections Grant

Format

PDF

Language

eng (English)

Type

Text

Identifier

noyes_c_misc_948

Text Item Type Metadata

Text

permitted to enter upon such a voy-
age to-day. He reached his destina-
tion at Canton, with varying exper-
iences, 110 days afterward. Since
that time he has devoted his energies
to all the routine, and drudgeries,
and the thousand and one other
things that a missionary has to do.
He first had to learn one of the most
difficult languages for a foreigner to
acquire. At different times in his
work he had to be printer, and pub-
lisher, and translator, and interpeter,
and preacher, and itinerant Christian
worker, and teacher, and professor,
ending up finally at the head of the
theological seminary. He became a
worthy successor of such men as
Morrison, Williams, Bridgman, Hap-
per, Lowrie, and others whose names
are household words in missionary
circles.
Our own church cannot help but
feel a pardonable pride in our miss-
ionary record, having sent at least
six missionaries into the foreign field,
doubtless a record that is surpassed
by few if any churches in the Synod
upon some of the new movements of
of Ohio. And we are more than
proud of the record the same miss-
ionaries have made, of which Dr.
Noyes heads the list.
In the introduction of one of his
Monday lectures, Joseph Cook makes
use of the following language. “In
the Sistine chapel, at Rome, Michael
Angelo has represented the creation
of man, the picture exhibits a divine
form floating in infinite space, and
extending a hand toward the upraised
hand of Adam. The man lies almost
prone upon the earth. He is a body
but not yet a soul, and, although the
members of his form are complete,
symmetrical, majestic, they do not yet
feel their unity with each other. A
spark passes from the divine forefin-
ger to the suppliant, limp, passive
hand of man, and the different mem-
bers of his form are unified by the
soul.”
Then he adds in substance, Human-
ity; is that body; the different nations
are its members; the finger is God’s
hand; and the spark is Christianity.
The world embraces the body of hu-
manity. But that body is not yet un-
fied by a universal or cosmopolitan
faith. It remains for Christianity as
the instrument or spark in God’s
hand of unifying these different and
now discordant elements, by giving
to them a soul which shall unite them
in a living, active, universal faith and
reliance upon the only living and true
God.
And our good brother whose mem-
ory we revere to-day claims a share
of our reverence and gratitude for
the accomplishment of this great
work. Truly his life and services
give a practical illustration to us
that “the field is the world.”

Extracts From Letters
From Mrs. J. G. KERR.
Canton Jan. 22nd, 1914.
My dear Sisters;
Our precious brother is at rest in heaven.
The mortal frame lies in its last dreamless
sleep, the busy hands are folded and _ his
speaking eyes are closed never to look
upon us in this world. Only a little more
than a week ago he said to me “If we
go home in May it seems as though we
will hardly have time to get ready.” I
do not think he ever gave up the thought
of going home.
It was wonderfuf how his courage held
out and his interest in everything about
him and in everything pertaining to
mission work continued until the very
last.
The community did not realize he was
so near death nor did he. He was chosen
president of the Medical Missionary
Society at its annual meeting, the day
before he died.
It was suggested by one of the mem-
bers that he was going home on furlough
and the reply was, “That does not make
any difference, we wish him for our pres-
sident.” Dr. Boyd told him of this the
morning of the day he died.
I think it was only for an hour or two
that he thought he would not get well.
When William told him he was going
soon he sent his good-bye to those he
loved in America and to the Mission.
After he had sent his good-bye in Eng-
lish he spoke in Chinese but could not be
understood. We watched by his bedside
during his last hours, the doctor said he
did not suffer pain it was utter exhaust-
ion, not pain, the tired heart ceased to
beat that was all and we could not tell the
exact moment when the soul took its flight.
Our hearts are full of thankfulness that
God has given us such a brother to give
back to him, a shock of corn fully ripe.
We met his translator this morning at
whose side he has worked for years and
he broke down compietely and wept un-
restrainedly. How the Chinese loved him!
Canton, Jan. 23rd. 1914
Miss Harriet Noyes.
Dear Ones at Home:—
Today we have laid brother Henry to
rest beside Richard whom he loved so dear-
lv and they are together with the other
dear ones in the Many Mansions of our
Father’s house.
This morning the casket was placed in
the lower hall and hundreds of the
Chinese have looked upon his face and
the thought expressed was, he looks so
happy, he looks as though he was in
Heaven.
A great many flowers have been sent
in by friends and by the Chinese, wreaths
and other designs, The Chinese sent the
wreaths, many of them had colored flow-
ers but the others were all white. A very
large cross of white camellias and green
leaves was given by his students and a
beautiful cross was given by the True
Light Seminary students.
We procured white chrysanthemums and
tied them with white ribbon and placed
them on the casket with the cross from
the Seminary. I brought from home a few
heads of ripened wheat and tied them

with ribbon the same shade and placed
them in the casket. It seemed as though
it would give him pleasure it he could
know it for he loved the dear old place.
The funeral services were held in the
Memorial church the church was crowded
and floral tributes were everywhere.
The services were partly in English and
partly in Chinese.
Rey. J. J. Boggs and Rev. James M.
Henry members of the faculty conducted
the part in English and two of Henry’s
former students Rev. Wong Yuk Shung
our pastor in the second church, and Rev.
Mo Man Ming professor in Fati college
the part in Chinese.
The services were beautiful and most
impressive, every thing just as we would
have chosen to have it.
The cemetery is nearly five miles from
the church but about six hundred went
out there.
The procession was such as has never
been seen before people wondered who
it could be who was being laid away with
such honors. I wish you could have seen
the procession as it came to the cemetery.
We had gone out in chairs and could see
them coming, the road was filled as far
as you could see it.
The students of Fati walked, some be-
fore the casket carring six white banners
like scrolls on which were inscribed the
main facts of his life and work and the
others followed.
The casket was carried into the ceme-
tery by six bearers—Rev. G. H. McNeur of
the New Zealand mission, Rev. E. B. Ward
of the United Brethren mission, both of
whom teach in the Fati College, Rev. Mr.
Nelson of the American Board, Rev. Mr.
Pratt of our mission, and two Chinese pro-
fessors in the college.
A double male quartette sang “Saved
by Grace.”
It was a lovely quiet afternoon, the
sun shone through the trees and all
nature was at peace as we left the grave
of our loved one covered with flowers.
January 27th, I have sent you a cable-
gram, “Henry passed away January
twenty first.”
I handed it in here at ten minutes to
six this afternoon and if delivered prompt-
ly you will receive it about noon.
(The cablegram was received in Se-
ville at 11 A. M. Jan. 27th.)
Feb. 5th.
The evening I sent the cablegram I sat
up until midnight when I thought it
would be sure to reach you.
We know you received it and forward-
ed it for the Board cabled back “Sympathy
and prayers” which message we received
Thursday evening, Jan. 29th.
You now sorrow with us that we shall
see his face no more and rejoice in the
perfect happiness that we know is his.

Memorial Services ^[in Seville] In Memory of Rev. Henry V. Noyes, of Canton, China

A large and interested audience as-
sembled in the Presbyterian Church
last Sunday morning in observance of
a memorial service in memory of Rev.
Henry V. Noyes, D. D., of Canton,
China, who went out from his church
nearly fifty years ago, devoting his
life and energies in the broad field of
missionary work, and who passed
peacefully to his reward a few weeks
ago.
The church was beautifully decor-
ated with flowers artistically arranged
by loving hands, as a token of friend-
ship, affection, and good will toward
the family now bereft of this loved
brother, whilst the choir rendered
very impressively the music that was
used at his funeral services in China.
The following biographical sketch,
prepared by the. Rev. Arthur J.
Brown, D. D., Secretary of the Board
of Foreign Missions, was read:
The death of Rev. Henry Varnum
Noyes, D. D., of Canton, China, Jan.
21st. marked the passing from earth
of a great figure in the Mission work
of China. Dr Noyes was one of the
veteran missionaries. He was born
at Seville, Ohio, April 24th. 1836 and
educated at the Western Reserve
College and the Western Theological
Seminary, having been graduated
from these institutions in 1861 and
1865 respectively. In the early part
of his senior year in the Seminary,
Nov. 7th. 1864, he was appointed a
foreign missionary, and a year after
his graduation he married Miss Cyn-
thia C. Crane, of Jackson, Ohio., and
he and his wife set their face toward
China. They had to make the jour-
ney in a slow, uncomfortable, sailing
vessel, with very few of the conven-
iences with which such a trip can now
be made, sailing Feb. 3, 1866, They
were 110 days in “reaching Canton, a
journey involving much hardship that
can now be luxuriously made in 25
days. The conditions of life in China
at that time were also trying. The
young missionaries found a small
group of associates and a comparative
handful. of Chinese Csristians, and
they had to live among a population
then notorious for its turbulence and
hostility to foreigners. Two years
after his marriage he was bereaved
by the death of his wife. The young
missionary, however, applied himself
to his work with great devotion. He
studied not only the language, but
the manners and customs and relig-
ious conditions of the people. His ac-
tivities were varied and in evry de-
partment he showed himself a master
mind. He was a diligent and success-
ful evangelistic preacher of the gos-
pel, doing abundant work of an apos-
tle in sheperding the young churches
and counselling the Chinese ministers
and other workers. He became pro-
foundly interested in educational
work, clearly realizing that the
church could never be established in
China until it had an educated min-
istry. He was therefore, foremost in
developing upon the island of Fati in
Canton, a group of institutions, which
included an elementary school, a high
school, an academy, a normal school,
a Bible training school, and a theo-
logical seminary. He was for many
years the president of these institu-
tions, and after they had attained a
development which called for separ-
ate admistration, he became president
of the Theological Seminary, which
post he held at the time of his death.
He added to these multifarious
labors a large amount of literary
work. In collaboration with others,
he prepared a Chinese Concordance
of the New Testament, commentaries

on a considerable part of the Old Tes-
tament, and upon several of the
books of the New Testament. He
aided in the translation of the Old
Testament and in the revision of the
translation of the New Testament
and he wrote scores of magazine art-
icles. At various times during his
life in China he identified himself
with almost every movement for the
Christian welfare and help of the
Chinese.
In February 1876, he married Miss
Arabella Anderson, a member of the
Siam Mission, with with whom he spent
many happy years, and who survives
him. Their union was blessed with
two children, both of whom grew up
to become missionaries.
One, Richard V., died after a short
missionary career which gave promise
of large usefulness, and the other,
Rey. William D. Noyes, is now a mem-
ber of the Mission, and the principal
of the boys’ Academy with which his
father was so long connected.
At the ripe age of seventy-eight,
after half a century of conspicuiously
useful service for Christ in China, Dr.
Noyes was called to his heavenly
home. He was one of the Old Guard
in China, and only three of the large
number of missionaries connected
with the Presbyterian work in China
are still living. He saw Christian
work in South China grow from small
to great proportions. and he was him-
self one of the great factors in that
growth. A man of conservative tem-
perament, who looked with concern
later date, he was also a man of large
heart and generous sympathies. He
was a kindly man, a consecrated man,
a preacher, an educator, an author. a
scholar, a man whose life was so in-
terwoven in the development of the
kingdom of God in the metropolis of
China, and who was such a recognized
leader in that development that the
history of mission work in China can
never be adequately written without
reference to his large contribution to
it. While the Board deeply mourns
his departure from earth, it neverthe-
less recognizes the divine fitness of
things in translating to the larger and
clearer life of the world to come, a
man who has served his own gener-
ation by the will of God with such
eminent fidelity and success, and who
having arrived at an age when bodily
powers become feeble, and earthly
life was beginning to be that of pain
and weakness, was taken at the ripe
age of nearly four score, full of years
and honors. The Board makes rev-
erent mention of its gratitude to God
for such a life, and for a death which
our Christian faith ought to consider
a normal translation.
The Board extends its deep sym-
pathy to the bereaved widow and fam-
ily and to the mission, which has lost
the one who was regarded by every
member as a 'father in Israel.”
Sincerely Yours,
Arthur J. Brown.
The pastor of the church, Rev. C. F.
Carson, then spoke at length, of
which the following is a brief resume
of his impressive words. “In view of
the passing of this Christian mission-
ary, whose biography we have just
heard from one who has known him
officially for so many years, I have
thought it would be appropriate to
consider as our theme—The field in
which our brother was called to labor,
and in the cultivation of which he
spent his eventful life.
Let us consider therefore these
words from St. Matthew’s Gospel,—
The field is the world—Mat. 13:38.
To-day we meet 2 a memorial ser-

vice in honor of one who was at one
time an honored resident of this
community and a faithful and devout
member of this church. But years
ago he became imbued with a larger
vision and went out from us, that he
might become more useful and even
more honored in devoting the ener-
gies of his life in the broader field of
missionary work. Like the great
apostle to the Gentiles, he must have
asked himself, “Lord what wilt thou
have me to do?” And like the same
apostle he faltered not when the
finger of Providence pointed to the
foreign field.
Willingly and promptly he sacri-
ficed home associations, separated
himself from the friends of youth,
and took his departure to a foreign
country, not knowing what might be-
fall him there, whilst he was deeply
impressed with the conviction that he
might be the instrument in the hand
of God, of bringing to a heathen
people a knowledge of the gospel of
the Son of God.
In view of the character of the
work accomplished by our departed
brother, it seems to me that the text
of Scripture I have announced is very
appropriate to this occassion. And I
am quite sure had he been consulted
in regard to a service of this kind,
nothing would have pleased him
more than the exaltation of the work
in which he was so deeply concerned
and to which he devoted the energies
of his life. Surely his consecration,
his life, and his work, give to us an
illustration in concrete form, that
“the field is the world.”
It was as late as 1858, or only
eight years before Dr. Noyes entered
upon his work, that the celestial Em-
pire of China was actually thrown
open to Christian evangelization and
work. And who can say what the
influences for good of his nearly fifty
years of service has actually accom-
plished, as he taught in the schools
and preached in the chapels, and dis-
cussed in the markets, the great
truths of the religion of Jesus the
world’s Christ.
Perhaps in those years he had
many converts to the faith. But
that, great as it is in itself, is only
small in comparison with the larger
and more extended influence of these
same converts, in an ever widening
influence, until it permeates that
whole region of the heathen word. In
the past few years China has been
thrown open to Christian influence as
it never was before. Though at
present that influence seems to be
suffering under a partial eclipse, or a
passing cloud, yet it is only seeming
or temporary after all. And after
the eclipse is over, and the cloud is
past, the great Sun of Rightenousness
with healing on his wings, will con-
tinue to shed his rays of gospel light
over that land, now bedarkened with
superstition, and ignorance, the
blighting of heathenism, and false re-
ligion of every kind, and shine too
with an ever brightening lustre, until
the whole heathen world shall rejoice
in the blessed radiance of gospel
truth and the Christian can say of
that land, as Isaiah said of the people
of his day, “Arise, shine; for thy
light has come, and the glory of the
Lord is risen upon thee.”
Our brother and fellow church
member gave, nearly fifty years ago
a practical response to this call of the
Master. He with four other mission-
aries set sail from their native land
on the sailing barque, “Benefactor,”
a vessel so small, and insignificant,
and unseaworthy, as would not be

+ upon some of the new movements of



今天获准进入这样的航程。 110 天后,他带着不同的经历到达了目的地广州。自从
那一次他倾注了所有的精力
对所有的例行公事和苦差事,
一千零一个
传教士必须做的事情。
他首先必须学习最
外国人难学的语言
获得。在他的不同时期
他必须成为印刷商、出版商、翻译和解释者,
和传教士,和巡回的基督徒
工人,老师,教授,
最终排在首位
神学院。他成为了一个
这些人的当之无愧的继任者
莫里森、威廉姆斯、布里奇曼、哈珀、劳瑞和其他名字
在传教士中家喻户晓
界。
我们自己的教会不能不
为我们的错过感到可原谅的自豪-
离子记录,至少已发送
六位传教士进入外地,
无疑是一个被超越的记录
大会上的少数教会(如果有的话)
在一些新的运动
俄亥俄州。我们不仅仅是
以同样的记录为荣
ionaries 做了,其中博士。
诺伊斯位居榜首。
在介绍他的一位
周一讲座,约瑟夫库克让
使用以下语言。 “在
西斯廷教堂,在罗马,迈克尔
Angelo 曾代表创作
人,图片展示了一个神圣的
漂浮在无限空间中的形式,和
向举起的人伸出一只手
亚当之手。男人几乎说谎
俯卧在地球上。他是一个身体
但还不是一个灵魂,而且,虽然
他的形式的成员是完整的,
对称的,雄伟的,他们还没有
感受他们彼此的团结。一个
火花从神圣的食指传递给祈求者,软弱无力,被动
人的手,他的形体的不同成员由
灵魂。”
然后他在实质上添加了人性;是那个身体;不同的民族
是其成员;手指是上帝的
手;火花是基督教。
世界拥抱人类的身体。但那个身体还没有——
由普遍的或世界性的
信仰。对于基督教来说,它仍然是
上帝的工具或火花
统一这些不同的和
现在不和谐的元素,通过给予
对他们来说,一个将他们团结起来的灵魂
以活生生的、积极的、普遍的信仰和
依靠唯一活着的和真实的
上帝。
我们今天崇敬的记忆中的好兄弟要求分享
我们的崇敬和感激之情
这个伟大的成就
工作。真正的他的生活和服务
给我们一个实际的例子
“田野就是世界”。

信件摘录
来自 J. G. KERR 夫人。
广州 1914 年 1 月 22 日。
我亲爱的姐妹们;
我们宝贵的兄弟在天堂安息。
凡人的身躯在它最后的无梦中
睡觉,忙碌的双手合十,他的
说话的眼睛是闭着的从不看
在我们这个世界上。只有一点点
一周前,他对我说:“如果我们
五月回家 好像我们
几乎没有时间准备。”我
不要认为他曾经放弃过这个想法
回家。
令人惊奇的是他的勇气是如何保持的
出去和他对一切的兴趣
他以及与他有关的一切
任务工作一直持续到非常
最后的。
社区没有意识到他是
如此濒临死亡,他也没有。他被选中
医疗布道会会长
社会在其年度会议上,这一天
在他死之前。
是其中一位成员建议的——
他要休假回家
回答是:“那不
有什么不同,我们希望他成为我们的总统。”博伊德博士告诉他这
他死的那天早上。
我想只有一两个小时
他认为他不会好起来的。
当威廉告诉他他要去的时候
很快他就向那些他
爱在美国和传教。
在他用英语道别之后——
lish 他会说中文但不会
明白了。我们在他的床边看着
在他生命的最后几个小时,医生说他
没有遭受痛苦它完全筋疲力尽-
离子,不是疼痛,疲惫的心不再
击败这就是全部,我们无法分辨
灵魂起飞的确切时刻。
我们的心中充满了感恩
上帝给了我们这样一个兄弟
回到他身边,一粒完全成熟的玉米。
我们今天早上在
他为谁工作了多年
他争先恐后地崩溃了,哭了起来——
克制地。中国人多么爱他!
广州,1 月 23 日。 1914年
哈里特·诺伊斯小姐。
亲爱的在家的人:
今天我们让亨利兄弟
在他深爱的理查德身边休息,他们和另一个在一起
在我们的许多豪宅中的亲爱的
父亲的房子。
今天早上,棺材被放入
下层大厅和数百个
中国人看着他的脸,
表达的想法是,他看起来如此
高兴,他看起来好像在
天堂。
送了很多花
由朋友和中国人,花圈
和其他设计,中国人派出了
花圈,其中许多有彩色的花朵,但其他的都是白色的。一个很白色山茶花和绿色的大十字架
叶子是他的学生和一个
美丽的十字架是真主赐予的
光神学院的学生。
我们采购了白菊花和
用白丝带将它们系好并放置
他们在棺材上,十字架来自
神学院。我从家里带了一些
成熟的小麦头并绑起来

与丝带相同的阴影并放置
他们在棺材里。好像
这会让他很高兴,他可以
知道这一点,因为他爱这个可爱的老地方。
葬礼在
纪念教堂教堂拥挤
到处都是鲜花。
服务部分以英语和
部分中文。
雷伊。 J. J. Boggs 和 Rev. James M.
亨利学院的成员进行了
英语部分和亨利的两部分
往届学生黄玉松牧师
我们在第二间教会的牧师,牧师。
法蒂学院莫曼明教授
中文部分。
服务很漂亮,最
令人印象深刻,每一件事都和我们一样
选择拥有它。
墓地距离近五英里
教堂,但大约六百人去了
在那里。
游行是从未有过的
在人们想知道谁之前就已经看到了
可能是和谁一起被解雇
这样的荣誉。我希望你能看到
游行队伍来到墓地。
我们坐在椅子上出去了,可以看到
他们来了,路已经满了
如您所见。
法蒂的学生走了,有些是——
抬着六面白旗的棺材前
就像上面刻着
他的生活和工作的主要事实和
其他人紧随其后。
棺材被抬进墓地——
由六名持有者承接——Rev. G. H. McNeur
新西兰传教士,E. B. Ward 牧师
联合弟兄会的使命,两者
在法蒂学院任教的牧师先生。
美国委员会的纳尔逊,牧师先生。
我们的使命的普拉特和两个中国亲
学院的教授。
一个双男四重奏演唱“Saved
格蕾丝。”
那是一个可爱安静的下午,
阳光穿过树木和所有
当我们离开坟墓时,大自然很平静
我们所爱的人长满鲜花。
1月27日,我给你发了一封电报——
克,“亨利在一月份去世
二十一。”
我十分钟交到这里
今天下午六点,如果及时送达,您将在中午左右收到。
(电报是在 Se-
1 月 27 日上午 11 点在维尔市举行。)
2 月 5 日。
那天晚上我发送了我坐的电报
直到半夜我才想到
一定会联系到你的。
我们知道您收到并转发-
为董事会编辑,回电“同情
和祈祷”我们收到的信息
1 月 29 日星期四晚上。
你现在和我们一起悲伤,我们将
不再看他的脸,并为之欢欣鼓舞
我们知道是他的完美幸福。

塞维利亚追悼会纪念中国广州的亨利五世牧师

大量感兴趣的观众
在长老会教堂
上周日早上,为了纪念
纪念牧师的追悼会。
亨利五世诺伊斯,D.D.,坎顿,
从他的教堂出去的中国
近五十年前,献身于
广泛领域的生命和能量
传教工作,谁通过
和平地给他几个星期的回报
前。
教堂装饰得很漂亮——
与艺术布置的鲜花一起吃
用爱的双手,作为朋友的象征——
船舶、感情和善意
这个家庭现在失去了这个爱
兄弟,当合唱团演奏时
令人印象深刻的音乐是
在中国的葬礼上使用。
下面的传记草图,
编写的。牧师亚瑟 J。
Brown, D. D., 董事会秘书
外国使团,读到:
亨利·瓦纳姆牧师逝世
Noyes, D. D.,来自中国广州,1 月
21 日。标志着从地球的过去
宣教工作中的杰出人物
中国的。诺伊斯博士是其中之一
资深传教士。他出生
4 月 24 日,俄亥俄州塞维利亚。 1836 年和
在西部保护区接受教育
学院与西方神学
神学院,已毕业
从这些机构于 1861 年和
分别为 1865。在早期
他在神学院的大四,
11 月 7 日。 1864年,他被任命为
外国传教士,一年后
毕业时他娶了辛小姐
thia C. Crane,来自俄亥俄州杰克逊市,和
他和他的妻子面向
中国。他们不得不在缓慢、不舒服的航行中完成旅程
船,几乎没有这样的旅行现在可以提供的便利
1866 年 2 月 3 日启航,他们
在“到达广州,一个
旅途艰辛
现在可以在 25 年豪华制造
天。中国的生活条件
当时也在努力。这
年轻的传教士发现了一个小
一组同事和一个比较
少数。中国基督教徒,和
他们必须生活在人群中
然后以其动荡和臭名昭著
对外国人的敌意。两年
婚后他失去了亲人
由于他妻子的死。年轻人
传教士,然而,应用自己
以极大的热情投入到他的工作中。他
不仅研究了语言,但是
人民的风俗习惯和宗教状况。他的活动五花八门,在每个部门他都展示了自己是一位大师
头脑。他是一位勤奋而成功的福音布道者——
pel,在牧养年轻的教会方面做了大量使徒的工作
并为中国部长提供咨询
和其他工人。他对教育产生了浓厚的兴趣
工作,清楚地意识到
教会永远不可能建立在
中国直到它有一个受过教育的事工。因此,他首先在
在法蒂岛发展
广州,一组机构,其中
包括一所小学、一所高中
学校,学院,师范学校,
一所圣经培训学校和一所神学院。他为很多人
多年来,这些机构的总裁,在他们获得了
发展需要单独管理,他成为总统
神学院的,其中
他去世时担任的职务。
他在这些五花八门的
从事大量文学工作
工作。与他人合作,
他准备了一个中文索引
新约,注释

在旧约的相当一部分,以及在几个
新约书卷。他
协助翻译旧文
遗嘱和修订
新约的翻译
他写了几十篇杂志文章。在他的不同时期
在中国的生活,他认同了自己
几乎每一个动作
基督徒的福利和帮助
中国人。
1876年2月,他与小姐结婚
阿拉贝拉·安德森,成员
暹罗使命,与他一起度过
许多快乐的岁月,谁还活着
他。他们的结合很幸运
两个孩子,他们都长大了
成为传教士。
一个,理查德五世,在短暂的
传教事业带来了希望
有很大的用处,另一个,
雷伊。 William D. Noyes,现在是传教团成员,也是校长
他所在的男子学院
父亲是那么久的联系。
在七十八岁的时候,
经过半个世纪的显着
在中国为基督提供有用的服务,博士。
诺伊斯被召唤到他的天堂
家。他是老卫兵之一
在中国,只有三个大型
连接的传教士人数
与长老会在中国的工作
还活着。他看到了克里斯蒂安
华南工作从小做起
比例很大。而他就是他——
自我是其中的重要因素之一
生长。一个性情保守的人,一脸担忧
后来,他也是一个大人物
心和慷慨的同情。他
是一个善良的人,一个奉献的人,
传教士、教育家、作家。一个
学者,他的生活与世界的发展如此交织在一起
上帝的国度在大都市
中国,谁如此受认可
这一发展的领导者
中国宣教的历史可以
没有
提到他的巨大贡献
它。在董事会深切哀悼之际
他离开地球,但它承认了神圣的适合性
翻译成更大的东西
未来世界的更清晰的生活,一个
以上帝的旨意为自己这一代人服务的人
杰出的忠诚和成功,以及谁
到了肉体的年龄
权力变得微弱,世俗
生活开始是痛苦的
和弱点,在成熟时被采取
年龄近四分,满岁
和荣誉。董事会虔诚地提到对上帝的感谢
为了这样的生活,为了这样的死亡
我们的基督教信仰应该考虑
一个正常的翻译。
董事会向失去亲人的寡妇和家人以及失去亲人的使团深表同情
被每个人尊重的人
成员作为“以色列的父亲”。
您忠诚的,
阿瑟·J·布朗。
教会牧师 C. F.
卡森,然后详细地谈到,
以下是一份简短的简历
他令人印象深刻的话。 “鉴于
这位基督教传教士的逝世,我们刚刚了解了他的传记
从认识他的人那里听说
正式这么多年,我有
认为这将是适当的
以我们的主题为主题——领域
我们的兄弟被召唤去工作,
在他的栽培中
度过了他多事的一生。
因此,让我们考虑这些
圣马太福音中的话——
场就是世界——马特。 13:38。
今天我们遇到了 2 一场追悼会,以纪念一位曾在 1 岁
时间是这个的荣幸居民
社区和一个忠实而虔诚的人
这个教会的成员。但是年
以前他被一个更大的
异象离开我们,他
可能会变得更有用甚至
更加荣幸地奉献能源
他在更广泛的领域中的生活
传教工作。和伟人一样
外邦人的使徒,他必须有
问自己:“主,你想要什么?
有我的事吗?”和一样
使徒他没有动摇
普罗维登斯的手指指向
国外领域。他心甘情愿地和迅速地牺牲了家庭协会,分开了
自己从青年朋友那里,
并把他的离开带到了一个外国
国家,不知道那里会发生什么事,而他正深深地
对他的信念印象深刻
可能是手中的工具
上帝的,带给异教徒的
人们对福音的认识
神的儿子。
鉴于该人的性格
我们死者完成的工作
兄弟,在我看来,文字
我宣布的经文非常
适合这种场合。和我
我很确定是否咨询过他
关于此类服务,
没有什么能让他高兴
不仅仅是对工作的提升
他深感忧虑
并为之倾注了精力
他的生活。肯定是他的奉献,
他的生活,他的工作,给了我们一个
具体形式的插图,即
“田野就是世界。”
迟到了 1858 年,或者只是
诺伊斯博士进入八年前
在他的工作中,中国的天朝帝国实际上被抛出
向基督教福传和
工作。谁能说什么
对他近五十岁的影响
多年的服务实际上已经完成,因为他在学校任教
并在教堂里讲道,并展示
在市场上被诅咒,伟大的
耶稣的宗教真理
世界的基督。
或许那些年他
许多皈依信仰的人。但
它本身就是伟大的,它只是
与较大的相比较小
以及这些更广泛的影响
同样的皈依者,在不断扩大的
影响,直到它渗透到
异教词的整个区域。在
过去几年中国一直
向基督教的影响敞开
以前从来没有过。虽然在
目前这种影响似乎是
在偏食下受苦,或
飘过的云,却只是看似
还是暂时的。之后
日食结束了,云是
过去,正义的伟大太阳
带着治愈的翅膀,将继续散发出他的福音之光
在那片土地上,现在被
迷信和无知,
异教和各种错误宗教的败坏,也发光
一直散发着耀眼的光芒,直到
整个异教世界都将欢欣鼓舞
在福音的祝福光辉中
真理和基督徒可以说
那片土地,正如以赛亚所说的人民
他的时代,“起来,发光;为你
光来了,荣耀
主复活在你身上。”
我们的兄弟和同胞教会
近五十年前,会员给了
对这一呼吁的实际回应
掌握。他与其他四位传教士从他们的故乡启航
在帆船上,“恩人”,
一个如此渺小和微不足道的容器,
并且不适合航行,因为不会

+ 关于一些新的运动

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Citation

Kerr, Martha Noyes Noyes, Harriet Newell Unknown , “Extracts from Letters from Mrs. J. G. Kerr, January 22, 1914, and "Memorial Services in Memory of Rev. Henry V. Noyes, of Canton, China",” Letters from Harriet Noyes: Missionaries and Women's Education in Nineteenth Century China, accessed January 31, 2023, https://noyesletters.org/items/show/1059.

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