Section of Unsigned Letter to Mary, January 26, 1914

noyes_c_cor_646.pdf

Dublin Core

Title

Section of Unsigned Letter to Mary, January 26, 1914

Subject

Death; Ptomaine poisoning; Hospitals; Consuls

Description

The author, probably Harriet, writes to Mary about the Consul General who is in Shanghai. She talks about William and what he will inherit from his father, including a watch and Henry's share of the farm. The land has been divided up between Martha, Sarah and Henry. Mary and Henry had both gone to the hospital with ptomaine poisoning and it seems that Henry died. She writes about Mrs. Boggs serious illness.

Creator

Noyes, Harriet Newell

Source

Loose, The College of Wooster, Special Collections, Noyes Collection

Publisher

Unpublished

Date

1914-01-26

Contributor

Council on Library and Information Resources Hidden Special Collections Grant

Format

PDF

Language

eng (English)

Type

Text

Identifier

noyes_c_cor_646

Text Item Type Metadata

Text

True Light Seminary
Canton, China
American Presbyterian Mission
Jany 26 1914
My dear Mary,
I will write a little
tonight although there will
not be another mail leaving
until Feby 5th but as that
will be an Empress it will
perhaps not be far behind this.
William has been here today
he spoke about what Henry
said about what he left it has to be
attended to at once as the Consul's
duty is to see that it is settled
There is nothing much to do
but it must be referred to the
Consul General in Shanghai.
The Consul who is here now
Mr Davies was a classmate
I think at least was in Wooster
University with William and
James Henry. As I wrote
you Henry said that he
wished William to have father's
watch and his share in the

farm. Henry had some
money in the bank I do not
know how much and Will
said he was owing him some
and he could easily know about
that but supposed it would be
necessary to make some estimate
of the value of his share of the
farm. He understood that it
is to be left just as it is as long
as any of us live, but I told
him father did not make
any restrictions about the other
place but that he wanted the
home kept as long as any one
needed it. I told him that
Sarah Martha and Henry
agreed to divide the land
in thirds, and that Henry's
part was the South part,
and we concluded that
probably there would be about
twenty acres in each third
and worth forty or fifty
dollars an acre.
I told him it was difficult

to make much on a farm
when all the work must be
hired even if there were a man
to look after it and he said yes
he knew, and he wished they
could help you, but they found
it all they could manage to
look after themselves, the children
have been sick and that of course
has been expensive as Mary had
to take Henry to the hospital.
Then they were both sick with
ptomaine poisoning and had
to have a trained nurse to take
care of them for several days.
I imagine neither Will nor
Mary find it very easy to
economize but they try to do
so, they have a great deal
of company. We talked
about a cablegram it seems
as though one should be sent
to the Board, if so you will
probably hear it from them.
I feel as though I would
rather send it home but I

cannot bear to think of how
sad it would seem to you.
William said today that
Dr Woods said that [u] worry [/u]
would make the nerves (I suppose
it must be) so that the food would
not assimmilate so that was
really his trouble. I wonder that
it did not come long long ago.
I am so glad that he was
spared until it seemed that he
had lived a long life, and his
work has been so much to him
that he has been [u] glad [/u] to live,
and he has been such a blessing
to every one. William told him
that his life had been an inspiration
to him and that they would
try to carry on his work as he
wished. It seems as though
we cannot get along without
him in the Mission, his judgement
was always so good and his
opinions carried so much weight
Miss Churchill said that he
was head and shoulders above
every other man in the Mission
and it was [u] true [/u].

1914 (?) [Note: written in blue ink]
True Light Seminary
Canton, China
American Presbyterian Mission
There is another
shadow over us now. Mrs
Boggs is very ill. She has
pneumonia and rheumatism
of the heart. Last night they
were so alarmed her
finger nails turned black and
her feet and hands were cold
but today they hope she is better
but the crisis is not passed yet
If she should die I do not
know what would become
of Mr Boggs and Agnes.
Now it is the evening
of the 29th Christmas is in
the past. Mrs Boggs has
been very ill during these
days Dr Niles has been with
her all the time and Dr Bigler
as much as she could. Dr
Niles felt too anxious to be willing
to have charge of the care so it
was given over to Dr Davenport

the Shamin Doctor. Friday
she was so wild with delirium
that they sent for Dr Selden
Miss Stockton the trained
nurse (Mary Robinson's daughter)
has been there and also a
Chinese trained nurse.
Saturday she would not let
Mr Boggs nor her [u] darling [/u] daughter
Agnes nor Dr Niles nor Miss
Stockton come near her not
even come into the room.
I think now they consider
that the crisis has passed and
are hopeful, but she is very
[u] very [/u] weak. I saw Henry
the day before Christmas
Christmas day and the day
after. He seemed a little
better and he keeps up his courage
wonderfully. They are planning
to start home in May and
spend the first summer in
Washington Tacoma probably

and the next summer in
Ohio. Henry says the climate
of Washington seemed to agree
with him better than any
other. If he can get stronger
so as to make the voyage
with comfort I would
have some hope that he may
get better and perhaps have
several years longer to live.
I feel so glad for all the
time that we are spared
to each other for it makes
the time of separation that
must come at the end
shorter. It cannot be so
very very long for any of us,
it seems to me that I shall
live for some years but I
also feel that I would like
to have things in good shape
to leave at any time.
Your letter (Mary) about

our dear good brother Cyrus
came two or three days since
the day after Christmas. How
sudden it must have seemed
to you I am [u] so [/u] [u] glad [/u] you
had that last pleasant
Thanksgiving day to remember
It seems beautiful for him
to go so without any sadness
of farewell but it was sad
for Lois. He had suffered
so much pain I am
glad that he had none
at the last. How we wonder
how it seems on the other side
"Beyond the stars" there will
be many dear friends
over there, to meet us when
we go home for "They are
gathering homeward one
by one." We had a
very pleasant Christmas.



True Light Seminary Canton,
China American Presbyterian Mission
1914 年 1 月 26 日
亲爱的玛丽,
我今晚会写一点,
虽然直到 2 月 5 日才会有另一封邮件寄出,
但因为那将是一位皇后,
所以可能不会太远。
威廉今天来过这里,
他谈到了亨利所说的关于他留下的东西,
它必须立即处理,
因为领事的职责是确保事情得到解决。
没什么可做的,
但必须提交给总领事上海。
现在在这里的领事戴维斯先生是我认为至少在伍斯特大学与威廉和詹姆斯亨利一起的同学。
在我给你写信的时候,
亨利说他希望威廉能拥有父亲的手表和他在农场的份额。
亨利在银行里有一些钱,
我不知道有多少,
威尔说他欠他一些钱,
他很容易知道这一点,
但他认为有必要估计一下他在农场的份额的价值。
他明白只要我们活着,
它就应该保留,
但我告诉他父亲对另一个地方没有任何限制,
但他希望房子可以保留到任何人需要为止。
我告诉他,
莎拉·玛莎和亨利同意将土地分成三份,
亨利的部分是南部,
我们得出的结论是,
每三分之一可能会有大约 20 英亩,
每英亩价值 40 或 50 美元。
我告诉他在农场上赚很多钱是很困难的,
因为所有的工作都必须雇用,
即使有人照顾它,
他说是的,
他知道,
他希望他们能帮助你,
但他们找到了他们所有的东西可以自己照顾自己,
孩子们生病了,
而且这当然很昂贵,
因为玛丽不得不带亨利去医院。
然后他们都患了托马因中毒,
不得不让训练有素的护士照顾他们好几天。
我想威尔和玛丽都觉得节约很容易,
但他们努力做到这一点,
他们有很多公司。
我们谈到了一份电报,
似乎应该将其发送给董事会,
如果是这样,
您可能会从他们那里听到。
我觉得我宁愿把它送回家,
但我不忍心想到它在你看来有多难过。
威廉今天说伍兹医生说担心会让人神经紧张(我想一定是这样),
以至于食物不会被同化,
所以这确实是他的麻烦。
我想知道它不是很久以前就来的。
我很高兴他幸免于难,
直到他似乎活了很长一段时间,
他的工作对他来说是如此之多,
以至于他很高兴能活着,
他对每个人都是如此的祝福。
威廉告诉他,
他的生活一直是他的灵感来源,
他们会努力按照他的意愿继续他的工作。
似乎我们在使命中没有他就无法相处,
他的判断力总是那么好,
他的意见如此重要,
丘吉尔小姐说他比使命中的其他人都高出一筹,
这是真的。
1914 (?) [注:用蓝色墨水书写] 中国广州真光神学院 美国长老会 现在又有一个阴影笼罩着我们。
博格斯太太病得很重。
她患有肺炎和心脏风湿病。
昨晚他们吓坏了,
她的指甲变黑了,
手脚冰凉,
但今天他们希望她好点,
但危机还没有过去。
如果她死了,
我不知道博格斯先生和艾格尼丝会怎么样。
现在是第29个圣诞节的晚上已经过去了。
这些天来,
博格斯夫人病得很重,
奈尔斯医生一直陪在她身边,
比格勒医生也尽可能地陪着她。
奈尔斯医生觉得太急了,
不愿意负责护理,
所以把它交给了沙明医生达文波特医生。
周五,
她因精神错乱而疯狂,
以至于他们派出受过训练的护士(玛丽·罗宾逊的女儿)斯托克顿小姐来找塞尔登医生,
同时也是一名受过中国训练的护士。
星期六,
她不让博格斯先生、她亲爱的女儿艾格尼丝、奈尔斯医生和斯托克顿小姐靠近她,
甚至不让她进房间。
我认为现在他们认为危机已经过去并且充满希望,
但她非常非常虚弱。
我在圣诞节前一天和圣诞节后一天见到了亨利。
他看起来好多了,
而且他的勇气也很棒。
他们计划在五月开始回家,
第一个夏天可能在华盛顿塔科马度过,
明年夏天在俄亥俄州度过。
亨利说华盛顿的气候似乎比其他任何地方都更适合他。
如果他能变得更强壮,
以便舒适地航行,
我会有一些希望,
他会变得更好,
也许还能多活几年。
一直以来,
我都感到很高兴,
因为我们彼此得以幸免于难,
因为它使最后必须要分开的时间更短了。
对我们任何人来说都不会那么长,
在我看来我会活几年,
但我也觉得我想拥有良好的状态随时离开。
你关于我们亲爱的好兄弟赛勒斯的信(玛丽)是在圣诞节后的两三天后寄来的。
在你看来,
这一定是多么突然,
我很高兴你能记住最后一个愉快的感恩节。
对他来说,
这样离开似乎很美好,
没有任何告别的悲伤,
但对洛伊斯来说却很难过。
他遭受了如此多的痛苦,
我很高兴他最后没有痛苦。
我们多么想知道在“星辰之外”的另一边,
会有很多亲爱的朋友在我们回家的时候与我们见面,
因为他们正在一个接一个地集合回家。
我们度过了一个非常愉快的圣诞节。

Original Format

Letter

Citation

Noyes, Harriet Newell, “Section of Unsigned Letter to Mary, January 26, 1914,” Letters from Harriet Noyes: Missionaries and Women's Education in Nineteenth Century China, accessed February 29, 2024, https://noyesletters.org/items/show/707.

Output Formats