Letter II by Electa M. Butler, n. d.

noyes_c_cor_858.pdf

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Title

Letter II by Electa M. Butler, n. d.

Subject

Steamboats; Travel; Typhoons; Hotels; Quarantine; Plague; Mass media in missionary work; Coal; Schools; Methodist Church; Equestrian accidents; Presbyterian church buildings; Natural disasters; Japanese language

Description

Electa M. Butler writes about her journey with Miss Noyes from China to Japan. They experienced an awful typhoon in the China Sea and they could not go ashore in Amoy (Xiamen) because of quarantine regulations due to the Bubonic plague. She describes the Nagasaki bay and how coal is loaded by women. She recounts their stay at Karuizawa near Mount Asama including a description of the landscape, geography, architecture, the treatment of women and animals, and a discussion of recreational activities such as horseback riding.

Creator

Butler, Electa M.

Source

Loose, The College of Wooster, Special Collections, Noyes Collection

Publisher

Unpublished

Date

n. d.

Contributor

Council on Library and Information Resources Hidden Special Collections Grant

Format

PDF

Language

eng (English)

Type

Text

Identifier

noyes_c_cor_858

Text Item Type Metadata

Text

Letter II
At five o'clock in the afternoon
of August 3rd Miss Noyes
and I embarked on the
Steamer Powan, the night
boat for Hong Kong, where
we were to connect with
the Glengyle bound for
Japan. The evening
was fine, and after the
Powan had dropped down
stream beyond the noise and
din of the city, a sense of
rest and peace filled our
souls, we felt that we had
left all care and anxiety
behind us and we resolved
that as far as was possible
we would let it stay behind
us and devote ourselves
to gaining strength for
future use.
When we retired at an

early hour there were no
indications of storm, we
were therefore greatly surprised
to be aroused between two and
three o'clock in the morning
and told that we must go
ashore as speedily as possible
as a typhoon was expected
and the steamer would move
off to a safer anchorage. We
looked out and found
that we were at the wharf
in Hong Kong. The distance
between the two cities is 95
miles and the large river
steamers run down in
about eight hours.
The light of the moon was
brilliant and the night seemed
the personification of peace,
however, after a second
reminder that all passengers

3
must go on shore we summon-
ed coolies to carry our lug-
gage, and seating ourselves
in rickashas we enjoyed a
moonlight ride along the Praya
to the "Hong Kong Hotel" All
sounds were hushed only the
water in the Bay seemed dis-
turbed. There was to be heard
the ominous moan which
precedes a storm. As the
waves rose and fell the
moonbeams caught them giving
them the appearance of
lamps of golden light appear-
ing and disappearing.
Arriving at the Hotel we tried
to piece out our broken rest.
Before daybreak there were
seasons of wind and rain
followed by a lull which is
a sure indication of a typhoon

4
and it was not long before
the blow began in earnest.
After day break we could
see the typhoon signals
on the flagstaff at the
summit of Victoria Peak.
As the storm increased
in violence our minds be-
came disturbed as to what
had better be done under
the circumstances. The
Glengyle lay far out in the
Bay, the time of sailing
was at day break the next
morning, the prospect of
spending the night in the
harbor with a typhoon
blowing was not a pleasant
one. While we were trying to
decide whether we should face
the typhoon or wait two weeks
longer for another steamer

5
a messenger came to our
room to announce that
the steam launch conveying
passengers from the Hotel to
the Glengyle would leave at
an earlier hour than usual
because the increasing violence
of the storm would make
it dangerous to venture out
later. We were obliged to decide
at once. After a great deal
of hesitation we made up
our minds to go. Our tickets
were bought, our plans made
and we would not draw back
if it seemed to be the Lord's
plan to give us some rough
weather. We descended into
the cabin of the launch after
being nearly blown off our feet
in reaching it, and we were
rolled and pitched and

6
tossed up and down like
rubber balls as our energetic
little launch made its way
from the shore to our ship.
We are good sailors and did
not feel in the least seasick
but not so with Madame Du-
mas, the one lady passenger
beside ourselves. The anchors
held our good ship very steady
through the hours of a boisterous
night. The next morning after
some delay we sailed out of
the harbor although the signals
denoting rough weather were
still up. When we finally
cleared the hills that shut in
the beautiful harbor of Hong-
Kong, old ocean treated us to
a cool reception, by one
swish of her garments she sent a
cold wave over us as we eat just

7
inside the door of the Saloon
drenching us from head to foot
and we retired to our cabin
rather "under the weather" at
this unexpected rebuff.
At Amoy where we hoped to
spend a few hours with the
Misses Talmage and other
missionary friends we were
disappointed in not being
permitted to go ashore on
account of quarantine regu-
lations. The clean sunny
island on which Amoy is
built had not escaped the
"Destruction that wasteth
at noonday." Here as elsewhere
the Bubonic Plague was hold-
ing high carnival. The sky
hung over the place red and
threatening as we sailed
away in the evening. The

8
captain said he did not like
the look of it, it foreboded
storm. His prediction was
soon fulfilled, the storm
broke upon us about half
past eleven that night
and continued two days and
two nights. We soon realized
that we were in the most
severe typhoon of the season
and we were in the China Sea.
We could not have chosen
a worse place in which to
meet a typhoon. The China Sea
is so filled with hidden rocks
and so many vessels have
been wrecked on them that
many of the rocks bear the
names of the ships that they
have destroyed. One
peculiarity of this storm was
the unceasing, pitiless blinding

9
rain that obscured everything
beyond the steamer from view.
The second night of the
storm it was impossible for
the Captain to keep his bearings.
It was dangerous to go forward
The Captain told us in the early
part of evening not to feel
alarmed if the steamer stop-
ped as he expected to take
soundings every two and a
half hours, but as the night
wore on, we stopped every
five minutes and we did
not need to be told that we
were in great danger.
As the steamer stood
still in the terrible storm
and the electric whistle
sent forth an unearthly
screech it seemed like some
powerful animal brought

10
to bay. So strong apparently
when in the quiet harbor
near land, but so helpless
and such a speck on the
ocean in a storm like this.
Near midnight as I
sat alone in the dining saloon
the passengers being too ill
to leave their berths, and Miss
Noyes weak from recent ill-
ness and naturally of a
more trustful temperament,
was sleeping peacefully
through all the din and
war of the elements, the
sound of broken crockery
and the play of hide and
go seek among the various
articles of loose furniture
I expected to hear at any
moment the ship bump
against a rock. And yet
it seemed to me scarcely

11
possible that the Lord
would bring her back from
the very gate of heaven to
cast her into the deep. But
we know "God moves in a
mysterious way His wonders
to perform, and we are some-
times at a loss to understand
His dealings with His children.
It was just possible
that at midnight there
would be a change in the
weather and as I sat there
I prayed that it might
be so, that at twelve o'clock
we might have some sign,
the moon, the stars or some-
thing to guide us to our desired
haven. Then I went to our
cabin and peered throug the
port confidently expecting to see
the moon or stars, but the
wind shrieked, the pitiless

12
rain beat against our brave
ship and the hungry waves
rolled up mountain high
eager to swallow us down.
The thought passed through
my mind "It is not the will
of the Father to answer 'Yes'
to my prayer, if we go down
we shall also ascend and
soon be with Him. I will
leave the care of the ship
with the Lord and the
Captain." I lay down and
almost immediately fell
asleep. In less than ten
minutes I was nearly pitched
on the floor, everything was
rolling, it seemed as if the
timbers of the ship were
parting asunder. There
was a scream from Madame's
room and general confusion
we did not know until the

13
the next morning that at exact-
ly midnight the Captain
sighted the beacon light
from a light house and
when things seemed to the
passengers to be going to
pieces, he was turning his
ship in the direction of
this great boon to the sea-
faring man which had
given him his bearings
and enabled him to go
steadily forward until we
reached Shanghai the next
day. The care of our Heaven
ly Father thus manifested
toward us filled our souls
with joy. His promise was
verified "Then shall ye
call upon me, and ye
shall go and pray unto
me and I will hearken unto
you." During our

14
short stay in Shanghai we
called at the Mission
Press. We were told that the
typhoon had gone inland
but would possibly come
out again and find us at
sea. This was not very reas-
suring, but although the
weather was rough we had
no further trouble from
typhoons.
Nearing Nagasaki we
passed Pappenburg, from
the summit of which thous-
ands of the early Christians
were hurled into the sea
and perished for their faith
The harbor of Nagasaki
is considered one of the finest
in the world. It is surrounded
by wooded hills on which the
town is built. The ships

15
usually coal hear. The coal
from the great junks is
passed from hand to hand
up the sides of the steamer,
the work being done mainly
by women, and it is astonish
ing how quickly it is done.
We enjoyed a few hours
visit with Miss Bing and other
missionary friends in the
Methodist School which is
beautifully located on the
Bluff overlooking the Bay.
Passing through the Straits
of Shimonosaki we entered
the beautiful Inland Sea
and spent the hours of a
quiet Sabbath day in sailing
through one of the loveliest
water gardens in the world.
It is studded with picturesque
little islets which have
grown up out of the sea. The

16
surface of the water is dotted
with scores of little boats,
their square shined sails
gleaning in the sunlight,
but the curious Japanese
styles are gradually giving
place to boats of more
modern fashion but not as
pretty. As our ship went
steadily onward in her
course, she passed between
serated hills where the cur-
rent was so strong that it
seemed as if it would send
her against their jagged
edges. We watched with
breathless interest, but just
as she seemed about to
strike, she would make a
sharp turn and we were safe
in mid stream again.
At Kobe we stopped long
enough to visit the Congregational

17
school under the American
Board and dined with
Miss Brown of that mission
a graduate of Wilson College
Chambersburg Pa. and a class-
mate of Miss Julia Henry of our
mission. Miss Kaimoto is
now one of the faculty of the
school in Kobe. Three other
Japanese ladies dined with
us one of whom is President of
the [?W.C.P.U.?] in Japan.
We continued our journey
hindered by storm and wind
finally were overjoyed to leave
the ship to proceed on its
way without us while we found
shelter at number 2 Bluff
in Yokohama where we rested
a few days from the fatigue of
our boisterous passage.
August 25th found us our way

18
to Karuizawa, this time by
rail. It seemed like coming
back to civilization again to
be able to take a seat in a
railway car although Japan
cars differ vastly in comfort
and convenience from
American coaches. We had
planned to go earlier but
another severe storm of
wind and rain delayed
us. We learned afterwards
that those who went up
on that day were obliged to
walk five miles in rain
and darkness and through
a tunnel because there was
a wash out on the road.
Our train ran to Karuizawa
slowly up grade to a distance
of three thousand feet above
sea level and though
twenty-six tunnels, one

19
being of considerable length
but presently our little English
made engine came panting
and puffing out into a broad
open plain which we could
not see for darkness and our
ever present accompaniment of
rain. Dr Alexander, a mission-
ary of long standing who was
at the station waiting the
arrival of a friend, very kindly
procured rickashas for us and
we were soon on our way to
the village which was a mile
distant from the station.
The rain and darkness made
the ride seem long, but present
ly we turned toward a square
frame cottage from which
streamed friendly lights
and the sound of familiar
voices came pleasantly to our
ears. The shafts were put

20
down, the oilcloth protecting
us from the rain, removed,
and we found ourselves in
the midst of friends, some
of whom were from Canton.
Our host and hostess
came out to Japan as
missionaries six years ago
and we were fellow passengers
on the same steamer.
We received a warm
welcome and at once felt
delightfully at home
and thus began a month
of unalloyed enjoyment
the memory of which will
not lost its fragrance for
months to come. We were
soon refreshed by food and
warmth, and were hushed to
sleep by the music of a
babbling brook which found
its way from its mountain

21
home and passed the rear
of the cottage as it ran joy-
ously on in its course to the
sea. During the night
the rain ceased and the
mists sought their home in
the clouds. As we looked out
in the early morning, the ris-
ing sun of a new day had
just placed a crown of glory
on the head of Asama Yama
an active volcano a few miles
distant. Many of the
visitors to Karuizawa climbed
to the top of this volcano
which is eight thousand
feet high and looked down into
its yawning crater which is
two thousand feet across and
six hundred feet deep. We
wished very much to follow
their example, but by the
time we were equal to such

22
a climb, it was too late in the
season and the government
authorities would not permit
any one to ascend the mountain
"Little Asama" stands so
near to the larger mountain
that the two seem to be clasping
hands like parent and child
On the left and much nearer
to us stands Mt. Honarii or
(Lone Mountain). These
mountains rising from a
broad plain, which must in
time past have been a lake, are
conspicuous objects in the
landscape. The cloud effects
over their summits are ever
varying and wonderfully
beautiful. It was our practice
to look at Asama the last
thing at night and the
first thing in the morning
Indeed our eyes were turned

23
in that direction most of the
time during the month of our
stay in this delightful place
The plain on which we
were living was like a garden
of flowers and covered with
high waving grass. We were
told that during the season
there were as many as two-
hundred specimens of wild
flowers to be found in the
vicinity of Karuizawa. The
plain is traversed by several
small streams of swiftly
flowing water which have
their sources in the mountains
Less than a mile North
of us began the village street
which ended in the beautiful
Usui Pass leading up to the
top of the mountain.
Many of the summer residents
had built their cottages on

24
the flat plain others had
chosen the hillsides, while
still others preferred to be hidden
away in sequestered little
groves. The four corners of
these frail little structures
were fastened down securely
by strong cables to stakes
driven deep into the ground
a precaution necessary to pre-
vent them from being blown
away by the strong winds
that prevail at times.
Tall mountains can be seen
in the distance lifting their
heads to the skies. The
exhilerating air soon gave
us strength to walk miles
without fatigue.
A favorite walk led us
Westward, past one of the
little groves mentioned and
down into a ravine where

25
stood the springhouse and
by its side bubbled up the
largest, deepest and coolest
of Springs, the water was
cold and delicious and we
drank it "raw." It required
not a little courage to do this
because in Canton we drink
only the boiled rainwater.
The spring was the fountain
head of a noisy brook that
soon lost itself from view in
its onward way to the sea.
The springhouse was Spotless-
ly clean and the milk.
We noticed some fine looking
cattle feeding on the side of
Honarii which seemed to justify
the statement of their owners
viz. "The cows are all healthy
with no diagnosis to be blamed"
Leaving this shady retreat
we were soon in the beautiful

26
walk at the base of Honarii
giving ourselves up to the delight
of gathering wild flowers and
to memories of the long ago
when we were little girls of ten
summers running through
the woods in search of winter
green berries and acorns with
little caps on. Six years
ago I went with my Mother
to visit an Aunt, the two
sisters took me to visit a third,
the youngest sister. Our way
lay through the woods and
by the side of fields of ripe
grain, my enthusiasm for
the sights and sounds of
nature had not abated. My
Aunt was rather surprised
at my oft repeated exlama-
tions of delight. I said to her,
"Aunt, this world is [u]very[/u]
beautiful. Wipe out all the

27
sin and misery and it
seems to me we could scarcely
desire a better place in
which to live" She for answer
repeated, Eye hath not
seen, nor ear heard, neither
have entered into the heart
of man the things which God
hath prepared for them
that love Him".
One afternoon we climbed to
the top of Honarii and were
surprised to find its sum-
mit shaped like a basin
showing that at one time
it was an active volcano. The
side towards the South was
nearly perpendicular and
near the summit on this side
was a small cave. The young
and romantic members of
our household crept cautious
ly around the brow of the

28
mountain, entered the cave
which was just large
enough to allow them to sit
snugly to-gether and eat
their luncheon. It mattered
not to them that the clouds
lowered and finally emptied
themselves in a copious shower
sending the young explorers
home limp and bedraggled.
It was great fun.
One of the recreations of Karui
zawa is horseback riding.
The horses are small self willed
and rather vicious. Those used
by the government are large
fine looking animals import
ed from other countries.
Miss Noyes is an equestrienne
and as this form of exercise
was recommended to her
as being highly beneficial
she availed herself of the

29
opportunity to gratify her
love of riding. A small
gray horse was brought for
her use which preferred his
still and provender to
cantering aimlessly through
fields of waving grass which
he was not permitted to
graze. One day after trying
in vain to induce her to
turn homeward, he sud-
denly plunged down an
embankment but she was
too well versed in the man-
agement of horses to be
unseated. Through my
field glass only her curly
head could be seen as it
bobbed up and down with
the rapid motion of the
horse. The animal itself
being hidden by the tall
grass intervening between

30
us. We afterwards learned
that this horse was dubbed
"Balaam's Ass" because of his
obstinacy and that few of
the ladies were willing to
ride him. Many of the
horses are objects of pity.
They are misshapen
and ill fed creatures used
as packhorses going patient-
ly up and down the slip-
pery mountain paths too
heavily laden. We saw five
hundred pounds fastened
on the back of one of these
small horses, and this weight
was to be carried over the
mountain, we were not sur-
prised to hear that the poor
animal fell under its bur-
den before reaching its des-
tination. The Japanese are
not more thoughtful of

31
their women folk. They too
carry on their backs most
extraordinary burdens.
We stopped one slender
little woman who, looked,
as she came down the
mountain, like an anima-
ted bundle of charcoal,
and found to our great
surprise that she was
carrying one hundred and
thirty pounds of charcoal
in an oblong basket
strapped on her back. I
could not raise it from the
ground. This woman was
not an exception to the
general rule, we saw others
every day. At the entrance to a beauti-
ful grove of tall trees stands
a quaint structure called
"Union Church" erected

32
by Missionaries. Grand
meetings are held here
during the summer months
attended by hundred
of missionaries. We were
not in time for them but
the first Sabbath of our
stay in Karuizawa be-
tween three and four
hundred people gathered
in this quiet little temple
to worship God and we
listened to a most able
discourse delivered by
Dr. Ashmore of Swatow from
the text "Unto him be glory in the
church by Christ Jesus through
out all ages." In the after-
noon we enjoyed a Service of
Song in the same place. While
listening to several Solos sung
to the accompaniment of the
organ and four stringed

33
instruments, our eyes turned
to the open windows through
which we could see the bright
sunlight shining through
the tops of the tall cryptome-
rias, and the low voiced
murmur of the pines blend-
ed with the melody within.
Everything was light and
gladness I wonder if there
were other hearts in that
congregation as thankful as
ours were when we bowed our
heads and sent up a prayer
of gratitude to God for this
break in our lives of toil.
This "Light after darkness."
Rest and good air soon
gave Miss Noyes strength
to accompany on every excur-
sion indeed I made but one
without her and that was
to "Prospect Point" from the

34
summit of which we could
look down upon the jagged
tops of the tunneled mountains
Seen by our friends seat-
ed at the breakfast table at
home, we seemed not larger
than specks on the horizon.
Excursion to the "Lava Beds"
Among the excursions to objects
of interest beyond Karuizawa
the one to the "Lava Beds"
will ever be memorable to
those who participated
in it. On a beautiful
morning we started off
mounted on horses and in
fine spirits. We were not
long in discovering that our
horses were bad tempered
and vicious. This was especial
ly true of those ridden by
Prof. Watkins and Miss Noyes. The
pirouetting of these horses and the
coolness of

35
their riders under the circum
stances, would have delight-
ed the heart of any show-
man. As for the rest of us,
we kept well out of their
way and implored them
to keep at a safe distance
from us. Brave little Daisy
Staniland a child of eight
years who was mounted on a
packhorse talked about the
viciousness of these horses for
days after. She would say
"Miss Noyes' horse was so
bad O-----h, so bad^" But it
was not to either of these
two horses that we owed the
one accident of our trip
but to the bony packhorse
ridden by Miss Polk M.D.
which had called forth our
commiseration. We did not
suppose it had enough

36
spirit left in it to kick and
yet while she was walking
for a little while, it suddenly
threw up its heels striking
Prof. Woodworth who was
riding immediately in the
rear inflicting a wound below
the knee. Some one laughingly
told Dr. Polk that if she had
been riding the horse could
not possibly have raised his
feet more than two or three
inches from the ground
and Prof. Woodworth would
have been spared several
days of discomfort. The point in
this joke lay in the fact that
Dr. Polk's avoirdupois was
rather out of proportion to the
size of the nag which she
rode. After ascending a
mountain, we crossed a
plateau, wound round

37
the base of Asama Yama
and entered a deep wood
where seated on a mossy
bank by the side of an ice
cold spring we ate our
luncheon and then climbed
up and looked off over vast
fields of scoria piled up
like great boulders of rock
between which were openings
that seemed to have no
bottom, and we were obliged
to step very carefully to avoid
falling through. This
scoria was thrown out of
the crater of Asama one-
hundred and twenty-five
years ago in a melted stream
of lava which rolled over miles
until it covered acres of
ground. More recent shak-
ings of Mother Earth piled
it up in these great boulders

38
which seem so wonderful.
The afternoon was wa-
rming and the mists began to
chase each other down the
mountain sides as we turned
our horses' heads homeward
We had accomplished little
more than half the distance
down the mountain when
the sky grew black, the
wind blew and the rain
fell. We had little to pro-
tect us from inclement
weather and in a short
time we felt very uncomfort
able. Anxiety of mind
because of the risk to miss
Noyes and little Daisy made
the way home seem intermin-
able. When about a mile
from home the betto stopped
to feed his horse and I became
separated from the other
m
39
members of our party, they
went around a longer way to
avoid a broken bridge, but
when I understood that this
longer way ran parallel
with the railroad track, I
succeeded in making the
betto know that I preferred
to risk the danger of a
broken bridge rather than
travel near the railroad. There are
few things I fear more than the
"locomotive," and this fear is in-
tensified when seated on an
obstinate horse. When we reach-
ed the place where the bridge
had been, he came to my
side with his lantern and
pointing to the horn of the sad-
dle motioned to me to hold on
which I did and we were
soon safe on the other
side. I was the first to

40
reach home, the others
soon followed. Our poor
little drooping Daisy was
taken in charge by Miss
Gates M.D. A drink of hot
milk a warm bath and a
night's refreshing sleep
warded off all evil effects
and the morning light
found us none the worse
for our "exertion."
The "Heavenly Needle."
This is considered the highest
point in the vicinity of Karui-
zawa. From the summit of
this mountain two seas may
be seen on a clear day.
Our way led up through
the "Usui Pass" giving us a
fine view of the plain below
us and lofty mountains in
the distance. Twice in our
ascent we crossed a rapid

41
stream of water descending
to the plain below. At the
head of the Pass we came
out into a little village
and ascending a long flight
of stone steps to an old
temple we stood in its door-
way and enjoyed a fine
view of serrated mountains
which alone would have re-
paid us for our day's tramp
Leaving the village we
descended by a narrow path
way into a deep gorge where
we found another spring
the facsimile of the one at the
foot of Honarii. Returning to
the village we again ascended
the stone steps, passing
through the temple grounds
we saw a splendid large tree
several hundred years old.
A path in the rear of the

42
grounds led up the moun-
tain to a high plateau
which seemed several
miles in length, after
crossing this we began the
ascent of the "Needle." We
enjoyed a succession of fine
mountain views during the
day but we failed to catch
a glimpse of the two seas.
As we reached the point
of the needle the mists
rolled down into the
valleys and plain far
below us obscuring every
object from view and we
were up in the clouds. We
returned home in the even-
ing feeling well repaid
for our nine miles' walk.
What we saw, and what
we felt that day can not
be set down on paper

43
It may be compared to a
dream of beauty or a strain
of unwritten music.
"The Monastery in the Rock"
An hour's ride by rail carried
us through ever changing and
beautiful scenery calling
forth many exclamations of
delight and expressions of
regret that we could not
linger in some of the beau-
tiful places we were passing
At the village of Komoro
we left the train. The
monastery in the Rock was
several hours climb from
the village. Two very bony
pack horses without saddles
were the best Komoro could
do for us in the way of loco-
motion. In mercy to these
jaded quadrupeds only our
two young Japanese girls and

44
the invalids were permitted
to ride in turn. The recent
floods had carried away
the bridge spanning a rapid
river, we therefore, traveled
much out of our way to
find a suspension bridge
farther down the stream.
The climb up the mountain
was steep and long but
when we reached the sum-
mit whata feast was spread
before us; above, below and
around us was nature's table
of good things. Every appoint
ment perfect as only the
hand of God can fashion
things, not a flaw in any-
thing. Standing on this pin-
nacle in the quiet hush of
nature, it seemed difficult
to realize that sin and
misery and death were rife

45
in such a world of beauty
but it is only too true
"The trail of the serpent is
over all," We had climbed
so high that the Monastery
which stands on a high
elevation, seen from where
we were standing seemed
to be in a valley below us,
we descended to it and
found it an object of inter-
est well worth a visit.
We would gladly have spent
hours in this cool retreat
but the sun warmed us to
turn our faces homeward.
We wished to return by a
shorter route, the bettos needed
considerable persuasion before
they were willing to try it.
They were afraid that when
we reached the river there
would be no means of cross-

[Note: cut off] [?46?]
ing and we would be obliged
to retrace our steps. We were
willing to run the risk, hoping
thereby to save several miles
of travel. Our party con-
sisted of ladies exclusively,
feeling tired of the obstinacy
of the bettos I remarked
that it seemed rather
better to me, to have some
gentlemen with us as "[u]they
could make them go[/u]" As
events shaped themselves
this remark was remembered
with much amusement.
Miss Noyes said she thought
we were getting along very well.
When we reached the
river we found that a ferry
boat was making regular
trips across. It was pro-
pelled by some of the men
poling and others pulling

47
hand over hand on a rope
which was stretched from
shore to shore. The water
being high and swift
there was a spice of danger
in this mode of crossing
which made it all the
more interesting to some
of our number. We noticed
as we started out in the
morning another party com-
posed of ladies and gentlemen
who seemed bound for the same
destination. When we reached
Komoro on our return we found
this same party waiting for
the train at the station and
we learned that the ferrymen
at the river had refused to
take them over for less than
two and a half dollars for
each person. Not willing to
pay such a price, they had

48
turned back and had
spent the day in walking
about the streets of Komoro
and visiting its shops.
Our party horses included
crossed the river for one
dollar and a half. I had
to admit that in this instance
gentlemen were too expensive
and I joined in the amuse-
ment that my remark had
caused. "Nevertheless" I believe
that men [u]are[/u] useful [u]sometimes[/u].
On the night of the sixth
of September we were kept
awake by a terrible storm
of wind and rain which
continued all night. About
two o'clock in the morning
the roof of the house nearest
ours was blown off. It was
occupied by ladies and

49
they and all their belongings
were drenched. Bridges
were swept away, trees
uproot and small streams
changed into torrents.
Railroad communication was
cut off and those who wished
to return home before the end
of the month were obliged to
use packhorses to transport
themselves and their luggage
across the mountain.
Our thoughts went out as
never before to those "who had
gone down to the sea in ships"
I think that we shall never
forget to "Cry unto the Lord to
make the storm a calm unto
them and bring them unto
their desired haven."
Those who spent
last summer in

50
Karuizawa say that they
were treated to an Earthquake
once a week, but this year
there were none, and Miss
Noyes still remains a
stranger to the sensation
felt while the Earth is
trembling beneath one's feet
As for myself I feel quite
satisfied with my experi-
ence of four Earthquakes
when I was in Japan eleven
years ago.
As September drew to a close
the summer residents
returned to their homes
and their cottages were
closed for another year.
Our house was emptied of
its guests and finally
our host and hostess re-
turned to Tokyo and left
us in possession of the

51
house a we wished to
remain two weeks longer
We began housekeeping
and found it great
fun to use what little
Japanese we had picked
up with the aid of a
dictionary. When we be-
came too much entangled
we ran down to Mr and
Mrs Van Horn, the one
remaining family being
familiar with the language
they kindly unraveled all
mysteries for us.
The nights and morning
were quite cold. The clouds
and mists often enveloped
us, but we were not lonely
on the contrary we enjoyed
every moment whether in
sunshine or cloud. We
were to cook in turn but

52
the open charcoal furnaces
were very troublesome and
gave Miss Noyes too much
hard work for an invalid.
Being a "butler" I naturally
manipulated them more
easily and we made a
different division of labor.
I did the cooking and she
washed the dishes. This
arrangement suited me
much better even as a
"grown up" I like to shirk
dish washing.
We visited many of the
homes from which the
summer occupants had
gone. Miss Noyes said
they seemed like "Nests
from which the birds had
flown" Karuizawa
boasts of one hotel. During
the month of September it

53
was well filled with
soldiers suffering from
Beri Beri. Their garments
were white and their faces
grayish yellow. The officers
dressed in European costume
and wore trailing swords.
Every evening these soldiers
marched along the street
two and two trying to keep
step to a doleful ditty
which we were told was a
national air. Their diminu
tive statue and military
caps much too large for their
heads made them seem
like boys "playing soldier"
At each Port on our way up
to Japan, several small
Medical men filed up the
gangway and stepped on
deck to inspect the ship.
The ship's doctor tall

54
and broad shouldered tower
ed above them and look-
ing down from his lofty
height submitted good-
naturedly to their inspec-
tion. They are not, however
lacking, in cleverness and
efficiency.
Excursion to "Ko Say"
Ko Say is five miles from Karui-
zawa. Our interest in it
centered mainly in the fact
that Miss Rowe an English
lady of our acquaintance
has made this her home for
several summers. Three
years ago she started out
one morning to walk to a
village not far distant
and lost her way. She wander
ed about four days without
seeing a living soul and
having nothing to eat. She

55
is quite deaf and nearly
blind. There was a typhoon
and she had nothing but a
fallen tree for shelters.
Finally shoeless, hatless,
her clothing torn she found
her way back and fell ex-
hausted at the door of the
home where she had been
staying. The people were at
first afraid of her, but after
they had decided that she
was not a "fox," they nursed
her very carefully back to
health. We found Ko Say
a delightfully romantic place
The road to it led over a moun-
tain and through the woods
which had begun to change
their robes of green for the
richer tints of Autumn.
After our return we began
making preparations for our

56
departure from Karuizawa
He would gladly have
spent more time here but
I wished very much to
take Miss Noyes to Nikko
and other places which I
visited alone, eleven years ago,
and we wished to return to
Canton in time for the reopening
of the Seminary.
The morning of our departure
was clear and Asama put on,
for us, her robes of deep blue
and wore her crown of glory as
when we first saw her and
we looked at the beautiful
picture until the train enter-
ed the first tunnel and
then it became a pleasant
memory of the past.
Electa M Butler
Canton China



信二
下午五点
8 月 3 日 Noyes 小姐
我开始了
汽船Powan,夜晚
船去香港,在哪里
我们要联系
格伦盖尔开往
日本。晚上
很好,之后
波万摔倒了
流过噪音和
城市的喧嚣,一种感觉
安息与平安充满了我们
灵魂,我们觉得我们有
留下所有的关心和焦虑
在我们身后,我们解决了
尽可能
我们会让它留在后面
我们并致力于
为了获得力量
未来使用。
当我们退休时

凌晨没有
风暴的迹象,我们
因此感到非常惊讶
在两个和之间被激起
凌晨三点
并告诉我们必须去
尽快上岸
预计会有台风
蒸笼会移动
前往更安全的锚地。我们
向外看,发现
我们在码头
在香港。距离
两市之间是95
英里和大河
汽船在
大约八小时。
月光是
辉煌,夜晚似乎
和平的化身,
然而,一秒钟后
提醒所有乘客

3
必须上岸我们召集了苦力来搬运我们的行李,自己坐下
在rickashas,我们享受了
月光骑行沿海傍
到“香港酒店”全部
声音被安静了只有
海湾的水似乎受到了干扰。必须听到
不祥的呻吟
暴风雨来临之前。作为
海浪起起落落
月光抓住了他们给予
他们的出现
金色的光芒出现又消失。
到达我们尝试过的酒店
拼凑出我们破碎的休息。
天亮之前有
风雨季节
随后是一个平静,这是
台风的确定迹象

4
不久之前
打击是认真开始的。
休息后我们可以
看台风信号
在旗杆上
太平山顶。
随着风暴的增加
在暴力中我们的思想是——
对什么感到不安
最好在下完成
情况。这
格伦盖尔位于很远的地方
海湾,航行的时间
下一个是天亮
早上,前景

有台风的港口
吹得不愉快
一。当我们试图
决定我们是否应该面对
台风或等待两周
另一个蒸笼的时间更长

5
一位信使来到我们的
宣布的余地
蒸汽发射输送
旅客从酒店到
Glengyle 将离开
比平时早一个小时
因为越来越多的暴力
风暴将使
冒险出去很危险
之后。我们不得不决定
立刻。经过很多
我们犹豫不决
我们的心思要去。我们的门票
被买了,我们的计划已经制定
我们不会退缩
如果它似乎是主的
计划给我们一些粗略的
天气。我们下降到
发射后的机舱
几乎被我们吹倒
在达到它的过程中,我们是
滚动和倾斜和

6
像上下翻腾
橡皮球作为我们的精力充沛
小发射成功了
从岸边到我们的船。
我们是优秀的水手并且做到了
丝毫没有晕船的感觉
但杜马斯夫人不是这样,一位女乘客
在我们身边。锚点
保持我们的好船非常稳定
通过喧闹的几个小时
夜晚。之后的第二天早上
我们航行了一些延误
海港虽然有信号
表示恶劣的天气是
仍有上涨。当我们终于
清除关闭的山丘
美丽的港湾——
孔,古老的海洋对待我们
一个很酷的招待会
嗖嗖嗖嗖的衣服,她送了一个
当我们吃的时候,寒潮袭来

7
沙龙门内
从头到脚淋湿我们
我们回到我们的小屋
而是“在天气下”
这出乎意料的回绝。
在我们希望去的淘大
花几个小时与
错过Talmage和其他
我们曾是传教士朋友
失望于没有
获准上岸
检疫规定的帐户。干净的阳光
厦门所在的岛屿
建没逃过
“浪费的破坏
中午。”这里和其他地方一样
鼠疫正在举行盛大的狂欢节。天空
悬在红色的地方,
在我们航行时威胁
晚上离开。这

8
队长说不喜欢
它的样子,它预示着
风暴。他的预测是
很快就实现了,暴风雨
大约一半突然袭击我们
那天晚上十一点
并持续了两天
两个晚上。我们很快意识到
我们在最
本季强台风
我们在中国海。
我们不能选择
一个更糟糕的地方
遇到台风。中国海
充满了隐藏的岩石
很多船只都有
被他们摧毁了
许多岩石承受着
他们的船名
已经破坏。一
这场风暴的特点是
无情无情的致盲

9
遮蔽一切的雨
从视图之外的蒸笼。
比赛的第二晚
暴风雨是不可能的
船长保持他的方位。
前进很危险
船长很早就告诉我们
晚上的一部分不感觉
如果汽船按照他的预期停下来,他会惊慌失措
每两个和一个探测
半小时,但作为夜晚
穿在身上,我们停止了每一个
五分钟,我们做到了
不需要被告知我们
处于极大的危险之中。
当汽船站着
仍在可怕的风暴中
和电哨
发出一个超凡脱俗的
尖叫声似乎有些
强大的动物带来

10
到海湾。明明这么强
当在安静的海港
靠近陆地,但如此无助
和这样的斑点
在这样的风暴中的海洋。
像我一样接近午夜
独自坐在餐厅沙龙里
乘客病重
离开他们的铺位,小姐
诺伊斯因最近的疾病而虚弱,自然是
更信任的气质,
睡得很安详
通过所有的喧嚣和
元素之战
餐具破碎的声音
和捉迷藏的游戏
去寻找各种
散件家具
我希望在任何时候都能听到
船颠簸的那一刻
靠在一块岩石上。但是
在我看来几乎没有

11
可能主
会把她从
天堂之门
把她扔进深渊。但
我们知道“上帝在一个
神秘的方式他的奇迹
表演,我们有时不知所措
他与他的孩子们的交往。
这是可能的
午夜时分
将是一个变化
天气和我坐在那里
我祈祷它可能
就这样,在十二点钟
我们可能有一些迹象,
月亮,星星或其他东西来引导我们到达我们想要的
避风港。然后我去了我们的
机舱并通过
港口自信地期待看到
月亮或星星,但
狂风呼啸,无情

12
雨打败了我们的勇敢
船和饥饿的海浪
高山卷起
急于把我们吞下去。
念头穿过
我的心“这不是意志
父亲回答“是”
我的祈祷,如果我们下去
我们也将上升和
很快与祂同在。我会
离开这艘船
与主和
船长。”我躺下,
几乎立刻跌倒
睡着了。在不到十
分钟我几乎被投球
在地板上,一切都是
滚动,似乎
船的木材是
分道扬镳。那里
是夫人的尖叫声
房间和一般混乱
我们不知道,直到

13
第二天早上,正是午夜时分,船长
看到信标灯
从灯塔和
当事情似乎
乘客要去
碎片,他正在转动他的
船的方向
这对航海的人来说是一个巨大的恩惠
给了他他的方位
并让他去
稳步前进,直到我们
下一个到达上海
天。我们天堂的关怀
父亲就这样显现
向我们充满了我们的灵魂
高兴地。他的承诺是
验证“那么你们
呼唤我,你们
会去祈祷
我和我会听
你。”在我们的

14
我们在上海短暂停留
召见使团
按。我们被告知
台风已经进入内陆
但可能会来
再次出去,找到我们
海。这不是很让人放心,但尽管
我们遇到的天气很糟糕
没有进一步的麻烦
台风。
临近长崎,我们
经过帕彭堡,从
数千名早期基督徒的峰会
被抛入海中
为他们的信仰而死
长崎港
被认为是最好的之一
在世界上。它被包围
在树木繁茂的山丘上
城镇建成。船只

15
通常在这里使用煤炭。煤炭
从大船是
相传
在蒸笼的两侧,
主要做的工作
由女性,这是令人惊讶的
完成的速度有多快。
我们享受了几个小时
拜访冰小姐和其他人
传教士朋友
卫理公会学校是
位于美丽的
布拉夫俯瞰海湾。
穿越海峡
我们进入的下崎的
美丽的内海
并花了几个小时
航行中安静的安息日
通过最可爱的人之一
世界上的水上花园。
它布满了如画的
有的小岛
从海中长大。这

16
水面点缀着
带着几十条小船,
他们方方正正的帆
在阳光的照耀下,
但是好奇的日本人
风格逐渐赋予
更多船只的地方
现代时尚,但不如
漂亮的。当我们的船离开时
在她身上稳步前进
当然,她在
锯齿状的山丘,那里的水流很强,以至于它
好像它会发送
她反对他们的锯齿状
边缘。我们观看了
令人窒息的兴趣,但只是
正如她似乎即将
罢工,她会做一个
急转弯,我们很安全
再次在中游。
在神户我们停了很久
足以参观公理会

17
美国名下的学校
董事会和用餐
那次任务的布朗小姐
威尔逊学院毕业生
宾夕法尼亚州钱伯斯堡和我们的朱莉娅·亨利小姐的同学
使命。海本小姐是
现在是该学院的教员之一
神户的学校。其他三个
与日本女士共进晚餐
我们其中一位是
W.C.T.U.在日本。
我们继续我们的旅程
受暴风雨阻碍
终于喜出望外船舶继续其
当我们发现时没有我们的方式
在 2 号布拉夫避难所
在我们休息的横滨
几天的疲劳
我们热闹的通道。
8 月 25 日找到了我们的方向

18
到轻井泽,这次是
轨。好像来了
再次回到文明
能够坐在
铁路车虽然日本
汽车的舒适度差异很大
和方便
美国教练。我们有
计划早点去,但
又一场强风暴
风雨延迟
我们。后来我们了解到
那些上去的人
那天有义务
在雨中步行五英里
和黑暗和通过
一条隧道,因为有
在路上洗了个澡。
我们的火车跑到轻井泽
慢慢提升到远处
三千英尺以上
海平面虽然
二十六条隧道,一条

19
相当长
但现在我们的小英语
让发动机喘不过气来
并膨胀成一个广阔的
开阔的平原,我们可以
看不见黑暗和我们的
永远存在的伴奏
雨。亚历山大博士,一位长期存在的传教士,
在车站等候
朋友的到来,非常亲切
为我们采购了人力车和
我们很快就要到了
一英里的村庄
离车站较远。
雨和黑暗造就了
旅程似乎很长,但现在
我们转向一个广场
框架小屋从中
流媒体友好的灯光
和熟悉的声音
我们的声音很愉快
耳朵。轴被放置

20
下来,油布保护
我们从雨中,被移除,
我们发现自己在
朋友中间,有些
其中来自广州。
我们的主人和女主人
来到日本
六年前的传教士
我们是同行的乘客
在同一个蒸笼上。
我们收到了一份温暖
欢迎并立即感受到
在家里愉快地
就这样开始了一个月
纯粹的享受
其中的记忆将
没有失去它的芬芳
几个月来。我们曾经
很快就被食物和
温暖,并被沉默
听着音乐入睡
咿呀学语的小溪找到了
从它的山上

21
回家并经过后方
小屋欢快地奔向
海。在夜间
雨停了,
迷雾在寻找他们的家
云。当我们向外看时
清晨,新的一天初升的太阳已经
刚刚放了一顶荣耀的冠冕
在浅间山的头上
几英里外的一座活火山
遥远。许多
轻井泽的游客攀登
到这座火山的顶部
这是八千
脚高,俯视
它打哈欠的火山口是
两千英尺宽
六百英尺深。我们
非常希望跟随
他们的榜样,但由
我们平等的时候

22
一次攀登,为时已晚
季节和政府
当局不允许
任何上山的人
“小浅间”就这么站着
靠近大山
两人似乎紧紧相拥
像父母和孩子一样的手
在左边和更近的地方
对我们来说,就是 Mt. Honarii 或
(孤山)。这些
山从山上升起
广阔的平原,必须在
过去是一个湖,是
显眼的物体在
景观。云的影响
越过他们的顶峰
变化多端
美丽的。这是我们的做法
最后看浅间
晚上的事情和
早上的第一件事
确实我们的目光转向了

23
在那个方向大部分
我们一个月的时间
留在这个令人愉快的地方
我们所在的平原
生活就像一个花园
鲜花和覆盖着
高挥舞的草。我们曾经
告诉这个赛季
野生动物标本多达两百件
可以在里面找到花
轻井泽附近。这
平原被几条横穿
迅速的小溪流
流水有
他们在山上的来源
向北不到一英里
我们开始了村街
以美丽结束
臼井峠通往
山顶。
许多夏季居民
他们的小屋建在

24
其他人拥有的平坦平原
选择了山坡,而
还有一些人喜欢隐藏
在与世隔绝的小地方
格罗夫斯。四个角
这些脆弱的小结构
被牢牢固定
通过强大的电缆到木桩
深入地下
防止它们被炸毁的必要预防措施
被强风吹走
有时盛行。
可以看到高大的山脉
在远处举起他们的
前往天空。这
令人振奋的空气很快就给了
我们有力量走几英里
没有疲劳。
最喜欢的散步带领我们
向西,过去的其中之一
提到的小树林和
下到山沟里

25
站在弹簧屋和
在它的身边冒出
最大、最深、最酷
斯普林斯的水是
又冷又好吃,我们
“生”喝。它需要
没有一点勇气去做这件事
因为在广州我们喝酒
只有煮沸的雨水。
春天是喷泉
一条嘈杂的小溪的头
很快就从视野中消失了
它继续通往大海。
泉水屋一尘不染,还有牛奶。
我们注意到一些好看的
牛费叮在一边
Honarii似乎证明了
他们的所有者的声明
即。 “奶牛都很健康
没有诊断可归咎于“
离开这个阴暗的避难所
我们很快就在美丽的

26
走在Honarii脚下
尽情享受
采集野花和
对很久以前的回忆
当我们还是十岁的小女孩时
夏天贯穿
寻找冬天的树林
绿色浆果和橡子
小帽子。六年
以前我和妈妈一起去的
探望阿姨,两人
姐妹们带我去看了第三个,
最小的妹妹。我们的方式
穿过树林和
在成熟的田野旁
五谷,我的热情
的景象和声音
自然并没有减弱。我的
阿姨有点意外
在我经常重复的喜悦感叹中。我对她说,
“阿姨,这个世界很
美丽的。抹去一切

27
罪恶和苦难以及它
在我看来,我们几乎不能
渴望一个更好的地方
住哪”她回答
重复,眼睛没有
见过,也听过,也没有
已经进入了内心
人的事
已经为他们准备好了
爱他的人”。
一天下午,我们爬到
Honarii的顶部并且是
惊讶地发现它的山顶形状像一个盆地
一次表明
那是一座活火山。这
朝南的一侧是
几乎垂直并且
在这一边的山顶附近
是一个小山洞。年轻人
和浪漫的成员
我们家小心翼翼
躺在额头周围

28
山,入洞
这只是大
足以让他们坐下
紧紧地聚在一起吃
他们的午餐。这很重要
对他们来说不是云
降低并最终清空
自己在一个丰富的淋浴
派遣年轻探险家
家里一瘸一拐,衣衫褴褛。
这是非常有趣。
轻井泽的娱乐活动之一是骑马。
马是小任性的
而且相当恶毒。那些用过的
由政府大
漂亮的动物进口
来自其他国家的编辑。
诺伊斯小姐是一名马术运动员
并且作为这种锻炼形式
被推荐给她
作为非常有益的
她利用了

29
满足她的机会
爱骑。一个小的
灰马被带来
她喜欢他的使用
仍然和证明
漫无目的地慢跑
挥舞着的草地
他不被允许
轻擦。尝试一天后
徒劳地诱使她
转身回家,他突然坠落
路堤,但她是
太精通马匹的管理
坐下。通过我的
场玻璃只有她的卷曲
头可以看作它
上下摆动
的快速运动
马。动物本身
被高大隐藏
中间的草

30
我们。后来我们了解到
这匹马被称为
“巴兰的屁股”,因为他
固执和那少数
女士们愿意
骑他。许多
马是怜悯的对象。
他们畸形
和吃得不好的动物
驮马也耐心地在滑溜溜的山路上走来走去
重载。我们看到了五个
百磅紧固
在其中之一的背面
小马,这个重量
将被结转
山上,我们听到穷人并不感到惊讶
动物在到达目的地之前就承受了它的负担。日本人是
没有更多的考虑

31
他们的妇女民间。他们也
最背负
超乎寻常的负担。
我们停下了一个纤细的
小女人,看起来,
当她下楼时
山,像一捆活生生的木炭,
发现我们伟大的
令她惊讶的是
背着一百
三十磅木炭
在一个长方形的篮子里
绑在她的背上。我
无法从
地面。这个女人是
也不例外
一般规则,我们看到其他人
每天。在美丽的高大树林的入口处矗立着
一个古朴的结构,叫做
“联合教堂”竖立

32
传教士。盛大
会议在这里举行
在夏季的几个月里
百人出席
的传教士。我们曾经
不及时,但
我们的第一个安息日
三四点之间留在轻井泽
百人齐聚
在这个安静的小庙里
敬拜上帝和我们
听了一个最能
发表的话语
Swatow 的 Ashmore 博士来自
文本“愿荣耀归于他
借着基督耶稣的教会
所有年龄段的人。”下午,我们享受了
同一个地方的歌。尽管
听几首独唱
伴随着
风琴和四弦

33
乐器,我们的目光转向
通过打开的窗户
我们可以看到明亮的
阳光透过
高大的隐球菌的顶部,以及低沉的声音
松树的低语与里面的旋律融为一体。
一切都很轻松
高兴我想知道是否有
其他的心在里面
会众感激不尽
我们是当我们鞠躬时
发了一个祈祷
为此感谢上帝
打破我们辛劳的生活。
这“黑暗之后的光明”。
早点休息和好空气
给了诺伊斯小姐力量
陪伴我的每一次远足
机智吼她,那是
从“展望点”

34
我们可以参加的峰会
看不起锯齿状的
隧道山的顶部
坐在早餐桌旁的朋友看到
家,我们似乎并不大
比地平线上的斑点。
游览“熔岩床”
在对象的游览中
轻井泽以外的兴趣
“熔岩床”的那个
将永远难忘
参加的人
在里面。在一个美丽的
早上我们开始了
装在马上和
好精神。我们不是
很早就发现我们的
马脾气不好
和恶毒的。这很特别
对那些骑马的人来说是真的
沃特金斯教授和诺伊斯小姐。这
这些马的旋转和
凉爽的

35
他们的骑手在这种情况下,会让任何表演的心都高兴——
男人。至于我们其他人,
我们远离他们
方式并恳求他们
保持安全距离
从我们这里。勇敢的小雏菊
八岁的孩子
年谁被安装在
驮马谈到了
这些马的恶毒
几天后。她会说
“诺伊斯小姐的马是如此
糟糕哦,太糟糕了”但它
不是这些中的任何一个
我们欠的两匹马
我们旅行的一次意外
但对于瘦骨嶙峋的驮马
由波尔克小姐 M.D. 骑乘。
它唤起了我们的
怜悯。我们没有
假设它受够了

36
精神留在里面踢和
然而在她走路的时候
一会儿,突然
奋起直追
Woodworth 教授
立即骑在
后部在下方造成伤口
膝盖。有人笑着说
告诉波尔克博士,如果她有
一直骑马可以
不可能提高他的
超过两三英尺
离地英寸
伍德沃思教授会
幸免于难
不舒服的日子。点在
这个笑话在于
波尔克博士的 avoirdupois 是
反而不成比例
她的唠叨的大小
骑。登顶后
山,我们越过
高原,缠绕

37
浅间山基地
进入了一片深林
坐在长满苔藓的地方
冰边的银行
寒冷的春天,我们吃了我们的
午餐然后爬上去
抬头望去广阔
矿渣堆积起来
像巨石一样
之间有开口
那似乎没有
底部,我们有义务
小心翼翼地避免
跌倒。这个
炉渣被扔出
浅间一号陨石坑——
一百二十五
多年前在融化的溪流中
滚滚数英里的熔岩
直到它覆盖了几英亩
地面。地球母亲最近的震动堆积如山
在这些巨石上

38
这看起来太棒了。
下午开始变暖,薄雾开始
互相追逐
当我们转身时,山边
我们的马头回家
我们没有取得什么成就
超过一半的距离
下山的时候
天空变黑了,
风吹雨打
跌倒了。我们没有什么可以保护我们免受恶劣的影响
天气和简而言之
那时我们感到很不舒服。内心的焦虑
因为有错过的风险
诺伊斯和小雏菊
回家的路似乎没有尽头。当大约一英里
从家里打赌停止了
喂他的马,我变成了
与对方分开

39
我们党的成员,他们
走了更长的路
避免断桥,但
当我明白这
更长的路平行运行
随着铁轨,我
成功地制作了
打赌知道我更喜欢
冒着危险
断桥而不是
在铁路附近旅行。有
没有什么比我更害怕的了
“机车”,这种恐惧在坐在
固执的马。当我们到达——
ed桥的地方
曾经,他来到我的
站在他的灯笼旁边
指着马鞍的喇叭示意我坚持住
我做了,我们是
很快就安全了
边。我是第一个

40
到家,其他人
很快跟进。我们的穷人
下垂的小雏菊是
由小姐负责
盖茨 M.D. 一杯热饮
挤个热水澡和一个
夜晚清爽的睡眠
挡住了所有邪恶的影响
和晨光
发现我们并没有变得更糟
为了我们的“努力”。
“天针”。
这被认为是最高的
点在轻井泽附近。从山顶
此山两海可
在晴朗的日子里可以看到。
我们一路向上
“臼井通行证”给了我们一个
下面平原的美景
我们和高山在
距离。在我们的两次
上升我们穿过了一个急流

41
水流下降
到下面的平原。在
我们来的垭口头
到一个小村庄
并登上长途飞行
通往旧石阶的石阶
寺庙我们站在门口,享受美好
锯齿状山脉的景色
仅此一项就可以偿还我们一天的流浪汉
离开村庄,我们
沿着狭窄的小路下降
进入一个深深的峡谷
我们找到了另一个春天
那个人的传真
霍纳里的脚下。返回
我们再次登上的村庄
石阶,路过
通过寺庙场地
我们看到了一棵壮丽的大树
几百岁。
后面的一条小路42
地面将山带到高原
这似乎有几个
英里长,之后
穿过这个我们开始了
“针”的上升。我们
享受了一连串的罚款
期间的山景
一天,但我们没能赶上
两海一瞥。
当我们达到目的时
针的迷雾
滚入
山谷和平原远
在我们下面遮蔽每一个
从视图中的对象,我们
在云端。我们
晚上回到家感觉还不错
为我们九英里的步行路程。
我们看到了什么,以及什么
我们觉得那天不能
写在纸上

43
它可以比作一个
梦见美丽或压力
不成文的音乐。
《岩石中的修道院》
搭乘铁路一小时
我们通过不断变化和
美丽的风景在召唤
发出许多感叹
喜悦和表达
遗憾的是我们不能
在我们经过的一些美丽的地方流连忘返
在小诸村
我们下了火车。这
岩石修道院是
几个小时从
村庄。两个很骨
没有鞍的驮马
是最好的小诸可以
为我们做运动的方式。怜悯这些
疲惫的四足动物只有我们的
两个年轻的日本女孩和

44
残疾人被允许
轮流骑行。最近的
洪水冲走了
横跨急流的桥
河流,因此,我们旅行
远远超出我们的方式
找一座吊桥
更远的河流。
爬上山
陡峭而漫长,但
当我们到达山顶时,盛宴席卷而来
在我们之前;上面,下面和
我们周围是大自然的餐桌
的好东西。每一次约会都是完美的
上帝之手可以时尚
东西,不是任何东西的缺陷。伫立在这石峰之上,静谧安详
自然,似乎很难
认识到罪和
苦难和死亡盛行

45
在这样一个美丽的世界
但这太真实了
“蛇的踪迹是
总而言之,”我们已经攀登
如此之高,以至于修道院
它站在高处
海拔,从哪里看
我们站着似乎
在我们下方的山谷中,
我们下降到它和
发现它是一个值得一游的有趣对象。
我们很乐意花费
在这个凉爽的撤退中度过几个小时
但太阳温暖了我们
把我们的脸转向家。
我们希望返回
更短的路线,需要下注
之前有相当大的说服力
他们愿意尝试。
他们害怕当
我们到了那里的河边
不会是穿越的手段

[注:截断]
我们将不得不
追溯我们的脚步。我们曾经
愿意冒险,希望
从而节省几英里
旅行的。我们的派对
专门为女士服务,
厌倦了固执
我评论的赌注
似乎相当
对我更好,有一些
先生们和我们一样“他们
可以让他们走“作为
事件塑造了自己
这句话被记住了
很开心。
诺伊斯小姐说她认为
我们相处得很好。
当我们到达
河我们发现了一个渡轮
船定期
穿越。它是由一些男人推动的
极化和其他拉动

47
把手放在绳子上
这是从
岸到岸。水
又高又快
有一种危险的味道
在这种穿越模式中
这使得这一切
对某些人来说更有趣
我们的号码。我们注意到
当我们开始
早上另一个由女士们和先生们组成的聚会
谁似乎注定要一样
目的地。当我们到达
我们返回时发现的小诸
同一方等待
车站的火车和
我们得知摆渡人
在河边拒绝
以低于
两美元半
每个人。不愿意
付出了这样的代价,他们

48
转过身来
花了一天的时间走路
关于小诸的街道
并参观其商店。
我们的派对马包括
一个人过河
美元半。我有
承认在这种情况下
先生们太贵了
我也加入了我的评论所带来的乐趣
造成的。 “尽管如此”我相信
男人有时很有用。
在第六天晚上
九月,我们被保留
被一场可怕的风暴惊醒
风雨中
持续了一夜。关于
凌晨两点
最近的房子的屋顶
我们的被吹走了。它是
被女士们占据

49
他们和他们的所有财物
被淋湿了。桥梁
被冲走,树木
连根拔起的小溪流
变成了洪流。
铁路通讯是
切断和那些希望
在结束前回家
本月有义务
使用驮马运输
他们自己和他们的行李
穿过山。
我们的想法消失了
以前从未对那些“曾经
乘船下海”
我想我们永远不会
忘记“向主呼求
使风暴平静下来
并将他们带到
他们想要的避风港。”
那些花费
去年夏天在

50
轻井泽说他们
被地震了
每周一次,但今年
没有,小姐
诺伊斯仍然是一个
陌生的感觉
当地球在
颤抖脚下
至于我自己,我觉得很
对我四次地震的经历感到满意
我十一岁在日本的时候
几年前。
随着九月接近尾声
夏季居民
回到了他们的家
他们的小屋是
又关闭了一年。
我们的房子被清空了
它的客人,最后
我们的主人和女主人回到东京离开了
我们拥有

51
我们希望的房子
再多两周
我们开始做家务
发现它很棒
有趣的使用什么小
我们挑选的日语
在一个帮助下
字典。当我们变得太纠结
我们跑到先生和
范霍恩夫人,那个
剩下的家人
熟悉语言
他们很好地解开了一切
对我们来说是个谜。
夜晚和早晨
很冷。云
雾气常常笼罩
我们,但我们并不孤独
相反,我们很享受
每时每刻,无论是在
阳光或云。我们
轮流做饭,但

52
开放式木炭炉
很麻烦而且
给了诺伊斯小姐太多
为病残而努力。
作为“管家”我自然
更多地操纵他们
很容易,我们做了一个
分工不同。
我做饭,她
洗了碗。这个
安排适合我
甚至作为一个更好的
“长大了”我喜欢推卸责任
洗碗。
我们参观了许多
来自的房屋
夏季住户有
走了。诺伊斯小姐说
他们看起来像“巢
鸟儿从中得到
飞翔的轻井泽
拥有一家酒店。期间
九月它

53
充满了
士兵患上
贝里贝里。他们的衣服
是白色的,他们的脸
灰黄色。官员
身着欧式服装
并穿着拖曳的剑。
每天晚上这些士兵
沿着街道行进
两个和两个试图保持
踏上悲伤的小曲
我们被告知是
国航。他们的小
国家雕像和军事
帽子对他们来说太大了
头让他们看起来
像男孩子“当兵”
在我们向上的每个港口
到日本,几个小
医务人员提交了
舷梯和踩上去
甲板检查船舶。
船上的医生高

54
和宽肩塔
ed 在他们上方,从他的高处俯视
身高好心地接受了他们的检查。然而,它们不是
缺乏,在聪明和
效率。
游览“Ko Say”
Ko Say 距离轻井泽 5 英里。我们对它的兴趣
主要集中在事实
那位罗小姐会说英语
我们认识的女士
已将这里作为她的家
几个夏天。三
几年前,她开始
一天早上步行到
不远处的村庄
迷失了方向。她徘徊
ed 大约四天没有
看到一个活生生的灵魂和
没有东西吃。她

55
耳聋,几乎
瞎的。有台风
而她除了一个
为避难所倒下的树。
终于脱鞋,脱帽,
她发现她的衣服被撕破了
她在回来的路上筋疲力尽地倒在了门口
她曾经去过的家
停留。人们在
一开始怕她,后来怕了
他们决定让她
他们不是一只“狐狸”
她非常小心地回
健康。我们找到了 Ko Say
一个令人愉快的浪漫地方
通往它的路翻过一座山,穿过树林
已经开始改变
他们的绿色长袍
秋天的色彩更加浓郁。
回来后我们开始
为我们做准备

56
从轻井泽出发
他很乐意
在这里花了更多时间,但
我非常希望
带诺伊斯小姐去日光
和我其他地方
十一年前独自拜访,
我们希望回到
广州及时复工
的神学院。
我们出发的早晨
很清楚,浅间穿上,
对我们来说,她的深蓝色长袍
戴上她荣耀的冠冕
当我们第一次见到她时
我们看着美丽的
直到火车进入第一个隧道和
然后它变成了一个愉快的
过去的记忆。
Electa M 巴特勒
中国广东

Original Format

Letter

Citation

Butler, Electa M., “Letter II by Electa M. Butler, n. d.,” Letters from Harriet Noyes: Missionaries and Women's Education in Nineteenth Century China, accessed February 29, 2024, https://noyesletters.org/items/show/937.

Output Formats